Yupo Art Deco Lantern Lesson Plan

Yupo Art Deco Lantern Lesson Plan


[MUSIC PLAYING] The roaring ’20s were a
time of extravagant parties, decadent living, and opulence. Great economic prosperity
led to an explosion of social, artistic,
and cultural exuberance. It was during this
period that art deco was born, offering a visual
design aesthetic as rich and layered as jazz music. Art deco is a style of
architecture and design that first gained popular
public attention during the 1925 International Exhibition
of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts,
making it easy to see why the movement needed
a much shorter name. Art deco style was
applied everywhere to nearly everything
at the time, influencing high fashion
and architecture as well as everyday objects and
household furnishings. Not even something as
utilitarian as a vacuum cleaner was safe from this design craze. Art deco uses bright
colors and precious metals such as gold, silver,
and ivory combined with complex repeating patterns. I’m going to show
you a simple way to create an art deco
lantern using Chroma Molten Metals acrylic paints
to gild an art deco pattern onto
translucent yupo paper. Yupo is a plastic paper
that will give the lantern its strong support structure. Begin by folding the yupo paper
to create a desired lantern shape– a star, triangle, or a
circle, which needs no fold. I am going to make a square. Yupo is very strong and thick,
so go over it a few times with your finger. This is going to help show
where to line up the pattern. It makes assembly go
more smoothly in the end. At this point, the folds
are more like guidelines and make it easier to assemble
the lantern in the end. I’m leaving a 1/2
inch tab at one end. This is to attach one
side to the other. To start, you need an art deco
design, something with a bold, repeating shape. I have one here. Place your drawing
underneath your yupo paper. Tape both sheets to
your working surface. Or a piece of chip board
or cardboard works well. This allows you to
more easily move the piece while it’s drying. Trace the pattern, stopping at
the end with the 1/2 inch tab. You can use metallic paint
markers to trace the pattern, but I like to use a
detailer writer filled with acrylic paint. This gives a more raised surface
that looks more like gilding. When your pattern is
dry, you can begin to fill your design with color. Add a few drops of
Blick liquid watercolor to Liquitex pouring medium. You can adjust the
quantities of each paint. More pouring medium allows
for more transparency. Or for a darker color, increase
the amount of watercolor. I’m going to set this aside. I have a dry one here. Once this is dry, you can
cut to shape the bottom or top of your lantern. This could have scalloped edges. You can just follow the contour
of the pattern you’ve made. Then, using double-sided tape,
connect to the two sides. Hang the lantern by poking
evenly centered holes with a pushpin. You can hang with
wire or string. I’m going to use wire here. Alternatively, because
yupo paper is so strong, it could be made to simply sit
on a table over an LED light. To see this lesson as a PDF
with step-by-step instruction, a full list of materials, as
well as national standards, visit dickblick.com. You’ll find hundreds more
free lessons and videos there as well. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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