The Mystical Arts of Tibet

The Mystical Arts of Tibet


As a student, I think a lot. I mean students
in general, we’re doing a lot of things. We have a lot of work to do. There are many things on our minds. We’re also very uncertain about the future. And the monks – you just see them being so
peaceful. So when I met them at first, I was at peace
with myself… which is very hard as a student. (scraping) It helped me realize that, like, there are
more important things in life than just worrying about – worrying about very minute details. (clanging) (scraping) So the symbolism of destroying the mandala
and its whole meaning, I think is the impermanence of many things. So they spend about five days, working about
six hours every day creating this mandala. (scraping) And at the end, they sweep it all up. So all the stress that went into that – the
planning, the extreme detailed drawing – none of it matters at the end of the day. And I think how that relates to students is: say you don’t do well on one test or one exam. Or you get a “B” or you get a “C.”
It doesn’t mean you’re going to be a failure in life. I mean it’s a very, very optimistic way
to look at things. (clanging) (scraping) (scraping) What the sand mandala has to do with cultural
competency on campus: I think personally it’s very important. Madison, Wisconsin is predominantly white. A lot of people also don’t have experiences
with other cultures. So what this does is it brings a different
culture. (inaudible talking) You watch them. You also see their merch. You’re able to talk to different monks. Parts of other cultures that you might not
understand, or that you might not know about – you’re able to talk to them, and then they
help you with that. So I think – I definitely think it’s very,
very, very important, especially on a campus like this, for sure. We believe that, you know, each grain of sand – with the substance and also from our prayers – it carries some healing properties. As a part of this closing ceremony, then we
are going to dismantle it… which symbolizes the impermanence of all the
phenomena. (throat singing) (bell ringing) (chanting) (singing) We do invoke the water spirit and offer our
sand for them. And Tibetans, we believe that if these forces
of nature are healthy, and it contributes to the revitalization of the natural elements
of this earth, which is crucial for the well-being of all the inhabitants. And another purpose of sending of the sand in
the water is sending these healing energies to all of the world. Water, you know, evaporates and forms the
clouds and brings the rains. That’s global healing is the concept. (chanting and bell ringing)

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