Temporal Turn | Artist-in-residence spotlight: Sahej Rahal

Temporal Turn | Artist-in-residence spotlight: Sahej Rahal


The way that these objects themselves are made they’re put together with found objects that I bring in from the places that I work in. Like I started using found objects in art school. While I was doing that I got interested in the kind of lived histories and these little embedded memories that these objects sort of bear in themselves. There’s sort of entire lives in these objects. So the pieces right here are made out of these church pews that I found that were like hardwood oak and some of the some of the other objects are from the museum itself. And what happens is like when I get these objects in which are like you know sort of part of like the immediate physical history of Lawrence, they kind of become like the bones for these almost futuristic ruins to sort of take shape. So the installation outside is actually sort of like a negotiation with past or an attempt to negotiate the physicality of history in a certain way. And they also to my mind they’re ruins from the future. So I usually, I mean the kind of large monumental sculptures that I make are usually made out of clay. Here I’ve kind tried to approximate clay like because the work is going to be outdoors. So I’ve used cement stained with iron oxide to give it that you know make it looks like terra-cotta. It’s almost like cement is pretending to be this clay fossil. Also the nature of these objects becomes, becomes collaborative, you know just by like small, kind of in small ways. Like when you can’t possibly kind of lift one of the parts by yourself. It becomes this kind of collective act in which they’re made together. And it becomes like I get to play with people in in creating civilizations. And like there’s many hands that kind of touch it. And the objects that you find in these kind of like anthropological museums or like even an excavation like the remnants of a civilization the whole idea is like they made by like multiple hands. And that that for me becomes like physically being able to kind of orchestrate that in a way, like it doesn’t have like a singular marker or anything. And they become these like very confounding objects that was as well. That’s the best part of working collaboratively. It was really interesting to kind of respond to the architecture of the building as well you know. It’s this neoclassical, massive building. It’s really beautiful. And then kind of to have this absurd sort of occurrence of these objects that might look like these starships that have sort of you know, fallen right in front of it, and kind of fossilized, was really interesting to kind of play with. And yeah, that’s sort of what I wanted to do. You know, I mean create this kind of absurd excavation outside the museum.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *