Special Report Mandala

Special Report Mandala


[Music playing] [Omm…and monk chanting sounds]>>Female voice: NWTC hosted the mystical art
of Tibet Mandala sand painting November 15th through the 18th. This unique experience provided
students and staff at the college an opportunity to understand the sacred art. [Monks chanting sound]>>The symbol that they’re creating for us
is a symbol of wisdom. There are many different Mandalas that symbolize different things.
So we thought at NWTC a place of learning what a great idea to have one that symbolizes
wisdom.>>The monks that are working on the Mandala
sand painting here have been training for six or seven years. And then they have to
take a test and are chosen out of three thousand monks worldwide to travel around the U.S.
and educate others. There are two groups that are traveling throughout the U.S. and this
is one of them. I’m going to show you some of the instruments that they use. The first
thing that the monks need to do is to sketch the pattern onto the surface. And to do that
they use the white chalk, the compass and the ruler. Then when they apply the sand,
they use the metal funnel which as a large opening on one end and a small opening on
the other end. There are several types of funnels here. There are some that have larger
openings on the smaller end and smaller openings on the smaller end and that’s used to let
out either more or less sand. The way that they use these, I’ll demonstrate here, is
they scoop the sand into the base…into the bigger end here, and they bring it down into
the smaller end. And by using the metal stick here to rub against the grooves it lets out
sand because of the vibrations. And the faster you do it the more sand comes out and the
slower you do it the less sand comes out. I’ll set this out here. And the sand that
they’re using, this is the base color which is white marble sand and it’s very, very soft.
The other colors that they use are from the base color but they are added some nontoxic
coloring into them to give them the bright colors. And another tool that they use is
the arm pillow here because they spend lots of hours working on the painting and they
need to rest their arm on it in order to keep them comfortable. I know that you travel around
the world and educate people about these sand paintings. What is the most important thing
that you want people to learn from this?>>From this sand painting is not just a design
or diagram or arts that people can see with the eyes and admire. It’s all looks cool.
It’s not like this. The meaning and significant of this sand painting was to educate people
about dealing with the emotional things. It’s GPS or guide map for the spiritual journeys. [Chanting sound]>>I think for many of us, if it’s a culture
we’re not familiar with, it’s hard to really appreciate that culture. So I think having
something like this that helps you understand a different culture, hopefully then can get
you to the level of being able to appreciate.>>I think that it’s really interesting to
see different people. We all live kind of in our own little world. Even in the college,
the people in the health department stay in health building and the people in trades stay
in the trades building. Well, now you think about it, we stay in our communities so you
know the more we can bring people here. We realize there are billions of people out there
that are different than us but have values just like us. I think it’s extremely important. [Monk chanting and bell ringing sounds]>>Female voice: During the closing ceremony,
the monks dismantled the mandala, sweeping the colored sand to symbolize the impermanence
of all that exist. [Monk chanting and bell ringing sounds continue]>>Female voice: When requested, half of the
sand is distributed to the audience as blessing for personal health and healing. The remaining
sand is carried in a procession by the monks to a flowing body of water where it is ceremoniously
poured to disperse the healing energies of the mandala throughout the world.>>A student yesterday said what, they’re going
to create it for four days and then destroy it, that sucks. And I said, well, from our
perspective, it might. But to look at it from what it symbolizes and that it’s the journey
and the process of creating and that it symbolizes the impermanence of many things including
life.>>I just thought it was really kind of ironic
that they were going to be celebrating the impermanence of life with the sand painting,
and we all are taking pictures of it to make it a permanent record. I’m just blown away.
I think it’s so wonderful something that you, I’ll probably never see again. And to bring
it here to Northeast Wisconsin, I think it’s really special. [Ommm…and monk chanting sounds]

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