So Draw! Chapter 1: Paper, Pens

So Draw! Chapter 1: Paper, Pens


Ok, hello. For this operation we’re going
to need mainly two things. We’re going to need something to draw with, which is
typically a pen or pencil or crayon or marker, any old thing. And then of
course you will need something to draw on which is usually paper. Now I would
like to invite you to look around the place and find the crummiest, nastiest
cheapest paper you can locate. Now I’ve got — this is sheets of paper that came out
of the printer and they didn’t print quite right so they were basically
destined for the trash heap which makes them perfect for our purposes today. The
reason for that is: I have noticed that artists and other human beings find a
nice white clean piece of expensive pristine paper intimidating for some reason. They hate to take a nice piece of paper and make a mark on it and have it go
wrong. It’s like stage fright or something I don’t know what it is. So I don’t want
that that hesitation to be a factor in our exercise here. I don’t you think
twice about just taking a drawing that doesn’t quite go right crumpling it up and throwing it in the
trash can. That’s going to happen a lot because just getting started this is
this is the time to make lots and lots of mistakes and lots of drawings that don’t
quite work out. Ok so you can use the backs of envelopes, you can use pieces of
paper that you fish out of the trash, you can use candy wrappers lables, any old thing —
You get the idea. Something that will be unmissed if it doesn’t work out you can turn over
and use the back and of course you’re doing your bit for the environment, you’re recycling, reusing paper you’ll be known
as the environmental cartoonist. So here we are, we’ve got our paper, pencil our main
implements of distruction. Now what I tell my classes is this: Learning to be a
cartoonist is not much different than learning a new language. To me cartooning is not about drawing funny
pictures. A funny picture — Well let’s see here. There’s — this guy’s got the crazy hair and the
googly eyes, he’s got the weirdo smile. Let’s give him a stupid tie and gigantic
ears, peculiar body, little skinny arms. We can give him a big belt buckle. Ok, so I
would call this a funny picture but I would not call it a cartoon because it
doesn’t tell a story. Cartooning is about telling stories with
pictures. So we’re going to move past this stage. Of course this is very nice,
it’s a masterpiece, but it’s not about what we’re doing today. We’re going to
find as we go through this that I’m not so concerned about, at this point, about
how great an artist you are. My belief is if you learn the storytelling aspect of
it if you learn how to tell a story with pictures which you can do with stick
figures or little symbols or basic doodles or squiggles, things that aren’t
particularly thought of as great drawings you can still tell a story with
that. If you can learn to do that and you do it often enough, my belief is
your natural style will begin to emerge. It will start to assert itself. If you draw enough stories you’re going to become an accomplished artist
along the way. I like to say that if you set out to draw a hundred bad drawings I
guarantee you that your hundredth bad drawing will not be as bad as your first
bad drawing. It’s inevitable. Progress happens in spite of ourselves. So we’re
going to concentrate on learning how to tell the story and then we will let the
rest take care of itself. We will deal with some of that stuff along the way
but that’s not our main focus. Ok. There we go.

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