Political Correctness, Jazz Hands, Triggers, Censorship, and Sexual Art

Political Correctness, Jazz Hands, Triggers, Censorship, and Sexual Art


Hey, what are you reading? Oh, just something about an event where people
were asked not to clap afterwards because it could trigger anxiety. Well, that seems like a pretty good idea because
clapping can be pretty loud. Did they replace clapping with any other gesture,
like cheering? People were asked to use “jazz hands”
instead. It seems like a bit much doesn’t it? Clapping may be loud but that is part of its
purpose. The louder the clapping, the higher the audience
praise and excitement. How can this kind of measure be used with
jazz hands? It seems like a lot of widely accepted and
common ways of approaching art are being censored for the sake of the few who it makes uncomfortable
or anxious. Well, shouldn’t we take people’s concerns
into account? I mean, we are making progress in a lot of
ways because of how people have spoken up about the things that make their lives harder. What about all the ramps and elevators being
added to certain buildings to make them easier for handicapped people to access? Isn’t that a sign that we should always
be looking out for the minority? I’m all for people having the option to
take the elevator, but we shouldn’t be offended by people who take the stairs. Besides, being made anxious by clapping seems
like it could be overcome in most cases with some personal effort or maybe a therapist,
if it’s a serious case—it’s not really comparable to people who have to use wheelchairs. Alright, but I just think when something disturbs
people we should be willing to adapt and help them out. In many cases that could be a good idea, but
in many others it could be very over the top. Some of the censorship and significant accommodations
that are taking place these days seem to put the comfort of the few over the rights of
many. For example, the so-called “regressive left”
seems to be mirroring the religious far-right in its call for censorship of sexual (or seemingly
sexual) art. At Wellesley College, for instance, there
were many people who were offended by a statue of a man in his underwear—the image reminded
them of sexual assault and male privilege. Doesn’t this seem a bit like how conservative
Christians have sometimes been offended by and even called for censorship of statues
or other kinds of art? The intentions of the artist and the piece
are often skipped over and the protestors jump straight to how it makes them feel and
call for a ban. I’m not saying we should support something
just because it’s controversial or edgy—but if unique and strange art can’t be shown
on college campuses for fear that it will be censored, where could such themes actually
be explored? College is supposed to be a place to learn
about all kinds of ideas, even ones we disagree with. I wish college didn’t cost as much as it
does. Yeah, but that’s a different subject.

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