Playing with Fire in Larchmere Creates Beautiful Art

Playing with Fire in Larchmere Creates Beautiful Art


– [Tina] It’s so unique,
playing with molten glass, that’s the coolest thing. I mean, it is 2,200 degrees,
so there’s nothing cool about it, but it’s hot. (lively music) Hi, I’m Tina Haldiman, I’m
a glassblower, and I’m one of the owners at Larchmere Fire Works. – Hi, I’m Cassidy Anderson
and I’m the blacksmith at Larchmere Fire Works. – I took my first class at
the Glass Bubble Project. – [Cassidy] We met at
the Glass Bubble Project. My dad helped start the Bubble. Tina introduced me to my
first blacksmithing master. – And when Cassidy came
to Cleveland and we met a couple years’ in, we
decided that we’d like to start our own shop. I had always wanted to try glassblowing, it was something I was
always enthralled with. – I remember seeing it
when I was super young at the Yankee Peddler, and I just remember it felt like I had horse blinders on. I was just focused on that. – And at 32, I knew what I
wanted to be when I grew up. – It was just a lot of don’t
focus on the other stuff, focus on just the metal. And then it was focusing
on the metal which meant getting the glassblowing
and the metal going at the same time. Because it’s all about the same heat. – [Tina] You really have to
know what the glass is doing, you have to know how hot
it is, and a lot of that is just practice. – [Cassidy] I actually
learned by the color. I learned by the feel of it. You just have to bend it
the right amount, and where, and how much color it has
in one spot versus another will create a different twist. – So this is our hot shop. All this equipment here
was built by Cassidy and one of our other glassblowers. In the middle we’ve got our furnace. This stays on about 2,200 degrees 24/7. (upbeat music) So fun to see a person,
the shock of the heat, or the weight of the glass,
and how excited they get. That to me, that’s the best part. I like blowing glass, it is fun. But I love teaching glass. So every glass blown piece
starts with that first bubble. Then it’s just a matter of
gathering layer and layer and layer, adding color to it. – Teachings the main thing. I like making other artists, yeah. Getting, “Oh, I never
thought about it that way”, or “I want to do that”,
or “Now I can fix this or create this”. So I can heat it up, get it
to the point where I’m able to squeeze it together,
move it, extrude it out, twist it, bend it. We’re going to heat up
this section back here, and we’re gonna put a twist in it. It’s using the geometry
of the anvil, and then different angles of actual
hammering to be able to get the forms and shapes that you want. Cool. Done. Hook. – [Tina] And this is what
I consider the fun part. Cause you get to watch glass melt. And I’m using the metal on the
table to suck out the heat. The glass started at about 2,200
degrees out of the furnace, and as I’m working with it, it’s cooling. But when I say cold,
in glassblowing terms, that’s about 1,000 degrees. Don’t touch that. You have to go in layers. So the first layer,
when I’m doing a flower, I’m going to put some green on there, this is going to be my stem layer. So now, when I know that I’m hot enough, I’m going to go back to the
bench and do the sculpting. This is the part that
I can’t get two flowers identical if I tried. Cassidy and I do collaborations
because the glass and metal just fits together. It’s a very sturdy medium
and a very delicate medium. But they just fit so well together. – I just found that
curve, I don’t know how, just kind of happened. But it’s cool to be able
to help other people find that little, yeah, thing.

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