Monet’s Watercolor Lilies Lesson Plan

Monet’s Watercolor Lilies Lesson Plan


[MUSIC PLAYING] French impressionist painter
Claude Monet’s water lilies are featured in more than
250 of his oil paintings. These works depict the flower
garden at his home in Giverny and were the main focus
of his artistic production during the last 30
years of his life. I’m going to show you how to
create a classroom Giverny garden by arranging watercolor
paper petals into overlapping layers and applying
liquid watercolors using a variety of techniques. As in nature, no two
flowers will bloom alike. First, observe Monet’s
water lilies, discovering the use of color and texture. For this project, I’m using
Blick Student Watercolor Paper, which comes in 22
by 30 inch sheets. Cut a portion of the
paper into eight sections to make seven and a
half by 11 inch pieces. Each student will
need five pieces of this size to make a flower. Plan on using one
full sheet per flower. The remaining
portion of the paper can be cut into six sections to
make 10 inch by 11 inch pieces. And these will be used to
make the lily pad at the end. Choose one or two
base paint colors and apply Blick Liquid
Watercolors using a large brush to cover broad areas. And experiment with
your watercolor application by spraying,
dripping, mopping watercolors onto the paper. This is really a time to
explore different techniques, such as a wet on dry. That is where wet paint
is applied to dry paper. It allows for some
brushing marks. And then there’s wet on wet. Start with water. Wet out the paper. Then apply a liquid watercolor. Notice how that makes a very
different mark from here. Next we can experiment with
a dry brush on wet paper. Start by wetting out
your paper again. Then using a towel or cloth,
try to get as much moisture out of your brush as possible. Pick up only a
little bit of color. Blot it first, then
make your mark. You can also try a graduated
wash, where you start out with a very dark
concentrated color and let the color lighten. To do that, mix your
color with water, and then further dilute
that color with more water so that you can blend from fully
concentrated down the line. And finally, you can use
Brusho Crystals and water to add a little bit of sparkle
and color to your piece. The lily petals can be
any size, but as a guide, a template has been provided
with the full lesson plan PDF at dickblick.com. You’re going to want to cut
eight small, 11 medium, and 11 large pedals from
your watercolor paper. And I have some dry paper here. I’m stacking about
four sheets together to make four large petals. So after you’ve cut your
petals, stock a few together. Cut a one or two inch
notch at the very bottom. To shape your petal,
take the two tabs you’ve created with that notch. You’re going to fold
one over the other to make a curved petal shape. The tabs can be held with a
paper clip until they’re dry. Now, you’ll want to glue
all of your petals at once and have them dry before
you assemble your flower. To assemble your flower,
start with your four inch circular base. I have some dry petals here. You want to attach the
petals to the base. Start with the largest petals by
placing a small amount of glue on the back side where
you’ve just made that tab. Position each large petal on
the outside of the circle. You’ll work your way
around the flower, attaching all of
your petals this way. Now, you do want to
leave about a one to two inch diameter in the center
of your ring of petals. After you get the
large ones glued, you’ll move onto the medium
size and then the small. But leave a little opening. Have one here with
all of its petals. So we want a little spot here,
and that is to add your stamen. And to make your
statement, we’re going to start with
the same size paper. Fold it in half lengthwise,
and cut at regular intervals to fringe it. Cut down to about
3/4 of an inch there, so they’re all still attached. Roll the paper tightly
like a cinnamon roll and glue your ends together. Just a little bit
of glue at the end. Put a bead of glue
at the bottom. Place it in the center. Now, you can curl your petals
gently around your finger, around the end of a
pencil or a paintbrush to give it a more natural look. Create your lily pad by
drawing a basic lily pad shape onto a piece of watercolor
paper and then cut it out. The water lilies can
be glued to the lily pad for final presentation. To see this lesson as a PDF
with step by step instruction, a full list of materials, as
well as national standards, visit dickblick.com. You will find hundreds more
free lessons and videos there as well.

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