Making mugs with clay-pressing, part 2, firing and glazing

Making mugs with clay-pressing, part 2, firing and glazing


I’m going to make some mugs using the molds I made in the last video I have eczema on my hands, so I have to wear gloves when working with clay and most materials I am putting the lid on, so that later I can use it as a cutting line For easier detachment of the clay from the mold, I must lubricate the molds Like always, I am using bicycle oil Massage the clay good Basically, the goal is to spread a layer of clay on the surface of the mold It has to be not too thick, and not too thin. Equal thickness However, I don’t really care about precision here. I like to make rough shapes The oil makes it tricky for the clay to stay in its place You have to constantly feel if the clay is touching the mold’s surface Also to avoid bubbles, keep pressing or spanking the clay Feels good enough Adding the legs I could make a normal foot, but I am planning to make mugs that look like my beasts Each mug is a unique sculpture. Only the insides are the same This one has four legs Stamping my brand DAST onto the clay Feeling for bubbles again It’s time to attach the mug’s handle For better connection to the mug’s surface, I need to make what I like to call clay glue It’s basically the same clay mixed with a bit more water This will help the handle to instantly stick to the mug’s surface I am using the roughest clay available in stores. It has large particles in it And will give a nice and rough finishing, which is what I am aiming for The color red is because the clay contains iron Making a reasonably straight and square-shaped strip as the handle Scratching the surface so that the glue sticks better Making design choices as this was the first in the series Cutting the excessive clay away Using the plastic lid as a guiding line for my knife Looking for possible bubbles trapped between the mold wall and the clay It’s been a few hours passed. The clay is now “leather dry” Time to detach the clay from the mold If you leave it in, the clay will shrink and as it shrinks, it will crack as the mold prevent its shrinkage So it’s very important to remove the clay from mold while it’s still not dry But also not too wet, so it deforms when you take it out. This is a state called “leather dry”. Final touches before biscuit firing It’s been a few days and the mugs are now “bone dry”, and ready for biscuit firing I want to adjust the final edits before I fire them I am using a wet towel, and dragging the clay on its surface in order to equally straighten the ends I don’t mind if they are not 100 percent level Using a wet sponge to do soften the edges and remove possible sharp bits Ready for the kiln I like to fire my biscuit firing below 1000 C Even if the clay can handle much higher Less heat while biscuit firing makes the glaze better stick to the clay It would not matter if the mugs are touching while biscuit firing They will not stick to their neighbor since they are not covered with glaze So normally you can load more objects The kiln has cooled down and I can open it They are now ceramic They feel very good to hold Sorry, no sound Since I am using a very rough clay, it will need a second round of sanding after biscuit firing I figured for this particular design, it’s easier to level the legs post-biscuit firing Time for glazing The first thing to do is to put Vaseline on the foots, where the object is touching the floor This will prevent the glaze to stick to that surface It is important, because if the surface touching the floor in the kiln is covered with glaze, it will surely melt and stick to the floor And it is next to impossible to detach them with nothing breaking Mixing the glaze I am using blue earthenware glaze with certain effects in it The firing temp is between 1020 and 1080 C Using this as a measuring cup Yes, that just happened! I inhaled the toxic powder, but I will live! The guide says I have to mix the powder with “filler” 2 to 1 I don’t have that specific filler, so I am just going to mix it with normal transparent glaze powder That hair sticking out from one side tho! Adding water I like to add water little by little and see how it feels The mixture should not be too thin and not too thick Think of milk, but a bit thicker Of course you will have to steer it for a long time, until you see no bubbles Glazing the inner walls Let it sit for a few seconds until you see it sticking to the sides of the wall I’m just not so focused. Its 11pm! Normally you have to pour it swiftly and with no hesitations Looking for a container big enough so that I can dip the mugs into the glaze Don’t have one. So I just use the brush Not recommended if you want an equal and straight glaze Especially if the surface of your ceramic is flat Mine is not, so I don’t need to be too careful Just remember to not to make the glaze too thick close to the bottom As it will stick to the kiln while melting and dripping It’s really just trial and error I am using a different method this time I like to glaze my ceramics half-way on the outside So that you can still touch the ceramic I can do better pouring. Just did not film a good one 😀 Let all the drips fall before you turn the object Final touches and cleaning Using a wet sponge, I am cleaning the feet of the mugs from glaze So they do not stick to the kiln Loaded up the kiln again Remember, glazed objects should not touch in the kiln, otherwise they will stick Done! I am so happy with the results Note how the inside is neat and smooth because of the mold Thank you for watching! Next video, how to make a push-casting bowl

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