Lake Wood Designs

Lake Wood Designs


[drill whirring] [breath blown] [drill whirring] [breath blown] DEVIN GARRETT: Even adding
this little detail for how I’m doing the breadboards,
just went to the internet, and started looking, and
reading, and did two of them, failed miserably on them. So then I remembered we had some
mahogany much stronger, much more durable. And I was like,
all right, I’ll go get that, and kind of just
working through all that. And that’s really
cool, being able to use problem-solving
stuff, and then also having just an endless supply
of whatever to make the wood dreams come true, you know? The very first job I did,
I hand-sanded everything with a belt sander. And I said, after I
was done with that, I would never do that again. So– [chuckles] this machine
is very nice for that. [machine humming] So now what I do is send
it through the time-saver, and that helps to just
level everything out. That’s actually a
very satisfying part. Because you do all this
work to get it to a point, and it’s the reveal. And it’s kind of like
a box of chocolates, like you don’t know what you’re
going to get until you open it. Nine total tables. Three of them are smaller– 36 by 36 inch– white pine construction
in the middle, and then wrapped with Doug fir
around the outside. And then a buddy of mine,
Evan, has paragraphic images. He’s doing some wood burning. So by tomorrow, you should
have free access to everything. Yeah. This is our first project
working on anything together. So I’m a big fan, again, of
just letting it play out. And he’s got his own vision,
and I built the tables in such a way to make
it so he had a cleaner palette in the middle
and put a little bit more of the character on the outside. EVAN UNVERDORBEN: Basically,
we got Ursa Minor’s logo here, and then I hand-transfer
it using a transfer paper, and then just go through
with the wood burning tool about the size
of a normal pen, and just slowly start
shading and filling it in. BEN HUGUS: We did a soft
opening last September 24– friends and family, supporters
who helped make this happen. And I think the tables
showed up on the 23rd. So we were pretty nervous,
but they did come, and they look pretty. There was just worth
the wait, really, truly. He did a really nice job,
and Evan did an amazing job with the wood burning. And they’re both artists,
so it was amazing. I really like
working with Devin. His wood, it’s
all about a story, and he even knows the story
behind some of this stuff comes halfway
across the country. And the wood burning
and the reclaimed wood is just a really
nice combination. It really looks well together. DEVIN GARRETT: This
is all reclaimed wood, so it has a life that it
may have been over 100 years since it was a tree. It’s super stable
for the most part. The grain structure is way
tighter, much more consistent. And it’s very easy to
go out into the yard and find 2×12
that’s 25 feet long. Here, we’ve got a bunch 8x8s. Back behind here, we’ve got some
12 by, and 10 by, and bigger. And then we’ll get
into rows like this, where this is all redwood. Behind this stack of
redwood here, this is all tank bottoms from
maraschino cherry tanks. And actually, you can smell
kind of the cherry juice when you’re in that area. I really wanted
to do everything I could to make Duluth timber
reach its potential of what I thought it could be. This is what I’ve wanted to
have happen, in some capacity, over the last three
years, really. So right now, this
is really good. I really like this. I knew that Lake Superior
Bake House needed some tables, and I knew about a
couple of other jobs where they were kind of
like, oh, I’m not sure. So I just called
them, up and I was able to get three jobs
together right away. And it was enough to
buy the lumber I needed, buy the initial tools
I needed, and just kind of get my feet wet. BEN HUGUS: His scope
of work gradually grew. So it started with just
tables, and then it was tables in the bar, and
then it was tables, the bar, and the trim, and then it was
the tables, the bar, the trim, and other pieces. And we were like, ugh. He’s like, OK, I’ll do it. I’ll do it. I’ll do it. He works hard. He cares about his business. I’ve never seen someone
care so much about wood. He’s a little bit
of a perfectionist. At some points, I was
like, Devin, let it go. It’s OK. [snap] DEVIN GARRETT: I don’t consider
myself to be a carpenter or anything like that. I feel like I can
kind of figure it out through watching literally
YouTube videos and stuff, which is goofy, but that’s
just kind of how it went. And over the last two,
two and 1/2 years, I kind of shifted my way
down the river that way. And it seems to have worked. I don’t know. Yeah. Pretty happy with it. Every morning, when
I wake up and go, and put another 12 to
14 hours in and say, this isn’t that bad,
it really isn’t. [music playing] [buffer humming] You know, I have a great
guy that works in the yard, and my brother
helps a little bit, but they don’t
know anything about the chiseling and mortise and
tenon and all that heavy stuff. So that’s been the toughest
part so far, is just, right now, it’s production
and it just really being me. So the really long
hours are wearing. And I don’t really mind hours. It’s just like, OK, got to
get through all these tables, then I got to build a box beam
and just kind of keep it going. And so I’m just waiting for
that tipping point, where I can get another person
in, and then there’ll be a new problem– [chuckles] which
I look forward to.

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