How To Take Off Paint Scuffs & Scratches! – Chemical Guys

How To Take Off Paint Scuffs & Scratches! – Chemical Guys


What’s up guys, welcome back to the Chemical
Guys Detail Garage. How many times have any of us woken up, come
out to our car and seen that someone has backed into it, or scratched it trying to parallel
park, and that’s the case with this Hyundai Sonata. The owner lives in an apartment and it sits
on the street where it looks like someone carelessly scratched the side of the vehicle. Could have been a car, could have been a passing
bicycle but it’s got these fine scratches into the quarter panel, rear bumper, as well
as the rear door here. We are going to show you one of the most effective
ways to remove it. Now, obviously, polishing is going to remove
it all, but since there are some superficial scratches here, I am going to show you that
maybe we can possibly hide it with just some glaze, which has fillers to help magnify the
gloss, deepen the glow, but it’s also going to help mask the scratches and swirls to blend
the finish if you don’t have access to a polisher. Now, obviously, we are going to clean the
surface of any surface debris, bird droppings, and anything else because we need to thoroughly
inspect the paint and also we are going to move on to a light clay bar service. To begin, we are going to use a favorite of
mine: Synthetic Quick Detail Spray. Just spray it on the surface. This is a great way to remove fingerprints,
bird droppings, or anything else that’s on the surface in between washes, or, in a case
like this, when you want to inspect the paint. I like to keep a bottle of this in the car
for when I’m going somewhere just to keep it looking its best. You can see that it just wipes off anything
on the surface nice and easily. It looks like a little tree sap or bee poop
there. Just saturate it, and then come over and gently
wipe it away. We can see that there are these fine little
hairs that are coming off which is actually just a very fine scratch that is pulling off
the clear coat so we have to be careful on what we are removing today. Polishing is going to refine the finish just
like we are doing when we are doing any kind of paint correction, it’s going to blend the
surface in a uniform shine. So, to get started, we will give it a quick
clay bar treatment to remove any impurities so we are not created any pig tails, and then
we can move on to the polishing process. Now, you see that I’ve just completed a light
clay bar treatment and that has prepped the surface by pulling off any of the embedded
contaminants. Now, the surface is nice and slick. Before we go ahead and do our actual polishing
or glazing step, I am going to use Wipe Out and this is just a further step to basically
prep the surface by removing any body oils or any kind of excess residue from the clay
or anything else that could be on the surface, this way, we are getting a true polish or
a true bond between the glazes, sealants, and waxes and this is also a good step to
practice when you’re applying a coating such as Carbon Flex C9 or if you have a carbon
or ceramic coating because anything that’s left on the surface can either harm it while
polishing, or it’s going to get trapped and locked underneath there after you’ve applied
your coatings.You see that the scratches are still there. All the clay is doing is prepping the surface,
it doesn’t do any polishing. That’s an old misconception when clay used
to have abrasives in there. New aged clays are just a synthetic material
that pull off embedded contaminants. Like I mentioned, I am going to apply a glaze
here just to show you a little 50/50 of what it can do. It will mask the minor scratch because as
you can see here, these are very fine, but some areas you can catch it on your finger nail
so it will require a polish. If you don’t have access to a polisher or
if you’re in a time crunch, then you can always put on a glaze to help mask it and make it
look its best. What we have here is Black Light. This one of my favorite glazes. It’s a favorite for a lot of people because
it helps to enhance any color really, but it’s designed specifically for dark colored
cars. We will just apply a little bit to this applicator
pad.You can use a foam or microfiber applicator pad. We’ll just do a little bit because we are
just working on a small area here. I’ll just basically blotch it out on the surface. This only takes about 15 minutes to cure so
while that’s happening, we will go ahead and set up our machine so we can start on the
rest of the area here and then I’ll show you this once it’s completely cured. We’ll probably polish over this anyway, just
so we get a complete uniform shine here. In an area that’s this small, since it’s basically
just the quarter panel, bumper, and a very fine scratch on the door, you can also hand
polish this, but for the best results, I always recommend machine polishing. This removes just enough clear coat, but it’s
consistent to give you the best results. So, while this is curing, let’s go grab our
machine and then we can start with the polishing step. Now, we’ve given Black Light about 15 minutes
to cure to the surface, and you can see that it has this very fine haze to it. I just applied a very fine coat, which is
saving product and time, but more importantly, only the first initial layer is going to be
bonding to the surface. Everything else is just being wasted. A fine coat is saving you time, effort, and
obviously money. It’s cured to the surface, so now we’ll just
take a clean microfiber towel and buff away the excess. It may hard to tell on camera, but the paint
on one side has a very nice, definitive dark area, and on the other side, you can still
see the scratches. Again, this is probably going to be hard for
you guys to see at home to see, but this is just a way to diminish the look, kind of helps
to mask it and make the car the looks its best. But, if you have access to a polisher, that’s
the best way to go because that’s going to remove the scratches by evening out the clear
coat. So, that said, let’s move over to our TORQ
10FX, which I have fitted with a 5″ microfiber pad because in my experience, with the very
fine, superficial scratches and the ones that are actually pulling clear coat off, this
kind of creates enough heat to blend in the paint back together instead of pulling it
off and then creating a deeper scratch or basically pulling more material off.Also,
we are using one of my go-to polishes, and that’s V36. This is basically a fine cutting polish so
it will diminish the scratches, but it also finishes it nicely so you don’t have to follow
it up with a second polish or compound it again or anything like that. Once you get the right technique, basically,
you can do this all in one: get your paint looking its best no matter what color it is
or how bad your scratches and swirls are. So, if you noticed, loading up your microfiber
pad is a little bit different than loading up your traditional foam pad because it has
all these fine microfiber hairs which you need to kind of spread the polish out evenly
on. I’m just using my finger to spread it out. Kind of working it into the pad. As always, we’ll spray a little bit of Pad
Conditioner on it because it creates a little bit more heat than your foam does. To reduce any marring, or excess heat, a little
bit of Pad Conditioner keeps it nice and moist and also helps the chemical, or compound or
polish do its job and give you the best results. So, as I mentioned, I already applied Black
Light to this small section over here and it’s masked the fine, superficial scratches
on this side, but there’s still some deeper ones, so we’re still going to polish it using
our TORQ 10FX. I’m going to go over the Black Light area
because I want the best results so it’s going to have a uniform shine. Whether you have a coating of sealant, glaze
or wax, or whether you have a coating of carbon or ceramic, polishing is going to remove that
so keep that in mind because if you just applied a fresh layer, it’s going to remove all of
that. To get started, we are just going to blotch
this out just like we always do, and we will spread it out on the lowest speed setting
and then on our highest speed setting we will do our polishing. Now, a couple of things to keep in mind, this
is a dual action so if you keep it an extreme angle or if you are pressing too hard, it’s
going to slow it down or stall the pad, which is not polishing. If you come up to a sharp edge like the body line
here, that’s also something to keep in mind because the paint is going to be thinner in
this area than on the side panels or any other panel in general. Just be careful, take your time, because polishing
is an art that takes practice, it takes technique, and also it takes a lot of patience to get
it right. So, I’m going to work on this and then we
will give you guys the before and after. If you guys want to check out these products
or learn more about this, head over to our website, Chemicalguys.com. If you like this car or if you have a scratch,
leave a comment down below, give it a thumbs up and as always, we will see you guys next
time right here in the Detail Garage.

57 thoughts on “How To Take Off Paint Scuffs & Scratches! – Chemical Guys

  1. Amazing work something about polishing calms me……..also you guys should make a red gaze and name it "Red Light District " ๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜‚ . Cant wait to see whats next.

  2. I have a polisher and Ive never used a MicroFiber pad. MF pads make me nervous but im sure they have their place in detailing. Can you tell me why you would use a MF pad vs a foam pad???

  3. Do yโ€™all have any product like black light but for lighter color on car or can we use black light for light color

  4. You guys have literally made me truly appreciate the paint on my m packaged bmw . After your videos I am all about detailing ! Iโ€™ve been on your website and ive been trying to find out how i can take my car to you guys to have the paint corrected by you personally, maybe even use my car for a video . I recently had my car re painted and the auto body shop was paid a lot of money, i feel like they cut corners with my paint job or finish.. i just dont have the eyes of a professional to really know, but to me, it doesnโ€™t look right. I took it back and after watching your videos i felt like it needed a wet sand compound buff. I feel like they never did it, just re buffed the car. Is that a normal practice after a new paint job ? Thanks for everything so far! Keep the videos up!

  5. Lol hold up the buff this car before they did this video then buff it again stop telling Stories no way u can get that Out go get a paint job

  6. I have a dodge challenger and it's curvy all over and I can't get the pad to move when I got to my hood and parts on my trunk. Do I get another machine or just hand polish??

  7. Your 6 step process involves glazing after polishing, yet in this example you've done the opposite and applied a glaze before using the V36 polish. Is the process interchangeable? Is it beneficial at times?

  8. Truth be told you can hide scratches under chemicals but when it wares away itโ€™s back to what it was scratches are for life

  9. I'm looking to buy a complete package detail kit from your company, including the torq polisher. Looking for a good deal, can you help?

  10. So you use a ipa based cleaner to remove โ€œbody oilsโ€ etc but spread the compound on the pad with your finger??

  11. Just got my order I'm fully loaded ready to clean up my dirty girl( car) you guys are awesome and very informative you just gained a lifelong member, and your way more affordable then autozone and advanced auto parts.๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿš˜๐ŸŒž

  12. Lol why does your reflection look like an older version of you? Products so good it's reflecting your future! ๐Ÿ˜ญ๐Ÿ˜ญ

  13. Excellent video! This is exactly what I need done on my F30. Need to get rid of scratches/swirl marks a.s.a.p.

  14. Everyone who asks me what I recommend for any detailing products weather that is interior detailing or exterior detailing I always recommend 10/10 chemical guys products. I use your stuff literally every single day I love it so much, itโ€™s night and day between other companies. Great job, LOVE IT!

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