How To Sand Walls – DIY At Bunnings

How To Sand Walls – DIY At Bunnings


I’m going to show you have to sand down a
wall in preparation for painting it. Now, first, the most important thing we need
is a sandpaper. Now, the lower the number, the more more coarse the grit. Unless the
surface is really rough, you probably want to go up a stage from there. Either a 60 or
an 80. This is less coarse, so its less severe on the wall. Of course, if you go too hard
with the coarse one you’ll leave big scratches that you’ve then got to sand out. So, ideally,
very light run with an 80, and then probably a 120 to finish it off. And just get a nice
smooth job, ready for our paint. If we have any deep gouges or scratches in
the wall, we really need to sand the surface and then go over and fill those, and sand
those areas again to get it nice and smooth, before we start to paint. And that’s very,
very important. Otherwise, it will show through. Now when we come to sand the wall, there’s
a number of different ways. We can do it like grandfather used to do, which is just a plain
board. We have our roll of paper, we just cut the appropriate length to fit on here,
and we’re ready to start sanding. Nowadays, we would tend to use the electric sander.
It makes a lot easier, and a lot less hard work. Another type of sander which is more
aggressive is the round orbital sander. This is very good on something like a plaster wall,
but on woodwork you’ve got to be very careful, because the action will tend to leave marks
on your wood. You buy something like that, and you get a pack of five with a Velcro backing
on it, which just simply peels and sticks to the sander. And of course, for the difficult
areas, like in the corners, or around the cornice, the old sanding block is a handy
standby. Again, cutting a piece off the roll, wrap it around the block, and then you can
just simply go to the wall and start to work your sanding. Probably when sanding, the best motion is
generally a circular motion. Unless you’re doing wood. If you’re doing bare wood, you
should always run with the grain, so you don’t get other scratches into it. But certainly
on a surface like a wall like that, using a circular motion, just a gentle circular
motion. And another thing that is very important is never use force on the instrument. You
just basically let the weight of the machine drive. You just guide it there. Because if
you put force on it, you’re only going to slow it down, and damage the motor. And the
other thing is, of course, you need to check your paper. You can see this is just starting
to show signs of wear. As the grit becomes clogged with dust and paint, you’re going
to find it just doesn’t work. It’s not efficient any more, it’s just sliding across the top.
So you need to look at it after every fifteen minutes or so, see how it’s going, and then
change it as necessary. Very simple process and easy to do. And will
give you a very, very nice job, as long as you take your time in preparing it.

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