How to Sail – Understanding the wind on a one person sailboat (Points of sailing)

How to Sail – Understanding the wind on a one person sailboat (Points of sailing)


bjbj{P{P Points of Sailing This training video
will help you to understand the different points of sailing that a sailing boat can
achieve, and the dynamics of the wind on your boat. In short what makes your boat move forwards.
Sails do not work if you point the boat straight at the wind, they simply flap. The sail will
only work if it sits at an angle of more than 45 degrees to where the wind is blowing from.
The area where sails don t work is called the no go zone. You can sail in any other
direction apart from this zone. Any point of sailing where the boat has the wind on
its left, is called port tack. And any point of sailing where the wind is coming from the
right hand side, is called starboard tack. s very important to have an understanding
of where the wind is blowing from, and is fundamental to everything that you will do
in the boat. To help you, you can use a masthead burgee which will point towards the wind.
Flags ashore are another indicator. Ripples on the water also blow from where the wind
is coming from. A flapping sail works like a flag and will lie in the same direction
that the wind is blowing from. s useful to understand how a sail works. If you sail with
the wind behind you, it s easy to see what happens, the wind simply pushes you forwards,
but how does a boat sail across or towards the wind like this? Here we see a cross section
of a mainsail, the aerodynamics of a sail work in a similar way to an aircraft wing.
The air travelling across the outside edge generates lift, which will blow the boat sideways.
By pushing down the centreboard to suit the point of sailing, the sideways slip is reduced
and the boat drives forwards through the water. The closest angle you can sail to the wind
is on the edge of the no go zone. This point of sailing is called close hauled. You should
have the sails pulled in tight, with the centreboard pushed fully down to prevent side slipping.
And by probing with the tiller to find the point where the sails just start to flap,
you are on the edge of the no go zone. Close hauled is the point of sailing you should
use if you want to sail towards the wind. Changing sides is called tacking and is the
subject of another video on this site. Sailing on subsequent close hauled angles, tacking
between them, you will eventually end up at your upwind destination. Together, a series
of tacks is called beating. The next point of sailing is called a close reach. To arrive
here from a close hauled position simply pull the tiller away from the boom for a short
while, raise the centreboard slightly, and release the sails to find the point where
they just start to flap. And then pull them back in so they stop flapping. Turning slightly
away from a close reach you arrive at a beam reach point of sailing. Here you will be sailing
at 90 degrees to the wind. A beam reach is the best point of sailing for your first sail,
as the sails and the boat are easily controlled. Adjust the sails as before, and you should
also raise the centreboard here so it is about half way up. Turning slightly away from a
beam reach you arrive at a broad reach point of sailing. Here you will be sailing at 120
degrees to the wind. And raise the centreboard so it s about two thirds up, and let the sails
out slightly as before. The next point of sailing is called a training run. To arrive
here turn the boat about 20 degrees away from the broad reach position and you will be pointing
almost directly away from the wind. Release the mainsail so the boom is almost at 90 degrees
to the boat, and the centreboard should be about three quarters of the way up. This is
the best point of sailing if you want to sail with the wind behind you, as there is less
of a risk of the boom accidentally flipping across, which is called gybing. However, if
you do need to change direction like this you should watch our video on gybing to see
how it s done. The final point of sailing is a dead run. This is when the boat is pointing
directly away from the wind. As you learn, this point of sailing is probably best avoided
until your wind awareness has developed. It is very easy for the wind to suddenly catch
the wrong side of the sail, which can cause the boom to flick across the boat very fast
and capsize you. Turning back towards the wind you can get back to any of the points
of sailing by pushing the tiller gently towards the boom, pulling in the sails a little more
to stop them flapping, and pushing the centreboard down, until you are on the close hauled point
of sailing once more. Key learning points The no go zone is an area about 45 degrees
either side of where the wind is blowing from, and the boat will have no forward drive in
this zone. Close hauled is on the edge of the no go zone. Sails are pulled in fully
and the centreboard is pushed fully down. Close reach. Turn 20 degrees away from the
close hauled point of sailing. Sails set so they just stop flapping. Raise the centreboard
a quarter of the way up. Beam reach is about 90 degrees to the wind. Release the boom so
it s approximately 45 degrees over the side of the boat, so the sails don t flap. Centreboard
should be half way up. Broad reach is about 120 degrees to the wind. And sails set so
they are just not flapping. Centreboard is about two thirds up. A training run is a further
30 degrees away from a broad reach. Boom is almost 90 degrees to the boat, and centreboard
is three quarters of the way up. Dead run is sailing directly away from the wind. Boom
is 90 degrees to the boat, centreboard stays at three quarters up. You must understand
and establish where the wind is blowing from, and adjust your sails and centreboard to suit
each point of sailing. Next steps Watch this video as many times as is necessary to get
an understanding of the points of sailing and how to recognise them, and what to do
with the sails and centreboard on each point. Use the script and glossary to help you. Then
on the water try to get a good understanding of the wind direction at all times to establish
what point of sailing you should be using. GLOSSARY Beam Reach – A point of sailing where
the boat is sailing at 90 degrees to the wind Beating – Sailing towards the wind in a series
of tacks Boom – A horizontal spar attached to the mast that supports the mainsail Broad
Reach – A point of sailing where the boat is pointing away from the wind at an angle
of approx 135 degrees to the wind Burgee – Small flag often at the mast head which is often
used to indicate wind direction Centreboard – A large plate that pivots and retracts inside
the boat, used to prevent sideways slip (called leeway) particularly when sailing close hauled
Close Hauled – The point of sailing required to sail as close as possible to the wind.
This is the edge of the no go zone Close Reach – Steering off a close-hauled course by approximately
20 degrees Dead run – Point of sailing where the boat is sailing with the wind directly
behind Gybe (gybing) – To change course from one side of the wind to the other, sailing
downwind. Mainsail – The main sail on a boat, the largest sail (except for the spinnaker)
controlled by the helmsman Masthead – The top of a mast No go zone – The area in which
a boat won t sail, 45 degrees either side of where the wind is blowing from Point of
sailing – Any direction of sailing Port Side – The left side of the boat when looking forwards.
Port tack – Any point of sailing with the wind on the left hand side Starboard tack
– Any point of sailing with the wind on the right hand side Tack – The manoeuvre used
to alter direction by turning across the wind, the bow goes from one side of the no go zone
to the other. Or the lower front corner of a sail Tiller – Attachment to the rudder by
which it is controlled Training Run – Point of sailing where the boat is travelling at
150 degrees to the wind PAGE PAGE hNg~ ho%G h#4A hNg~ ho%G h:R* hNg~ h#4A h(rh hw~% hw~%
h(rh h:R* h*DU &`#$ gdjF :pU| Script 7 – Points of Sailing penny Normal penny Microsoft Office
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