How to Measure for an Overhead Crane Install | Cranes 101| Ep 5

How to Measure for an Overhead Crane Install | Cranes 101| Ep 5


– Hey everyone, this is Chris Whitney here to talk to you this
morning a little bit about how to do an overhead crane measurement. The purpose of this video
is to give you the tools that you need in order to measure overhead cranes without having one of the crane specialists
come out with you. This will allow you to work
on projects on your own and ultimately be more
successful in your crane sales. The fundamentals of this
process are extremely easy. I’m just here to help
you be more successful. So, a couple tools that I’m gonna use in order to help measure out
this system is measuring tape. Typically, a good 25 to 30
foot tape is perfectly fine. Also, handy dandy laser, you can pick these up at Lowe’s or Home Depot. A cheap one is typically 65 to 70 dollars. You can get more expensive better ones that shoot longer
distances for 130 to 150. So, that is basically it. You take your paper and
your pen, you’re good to go. So what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna go through the process of
measuring on a system. So, first we’re gonna start
measuring the span of the crane, and then we’ll move into the runway in the event that you need to provide a runway with the crane system. We’ll also measure out
the building clearances so that we can accurately determine where on this crane system our hook is gonna land at its highest point. And then from there,
we’ll talk a little bit about cranes’ duty cycles,
that way you’ve got enough information that you can go in and talk with your client and be the knowledgeable
salesperson that you are. So when you first walk
into a client’s facility, you’re gonna walk in and you’re gonna say, “Hey look, I’ve got an
existing runway here already.” So, I know that my crane is gonna be going on the existing runway. From there, we’re gonna
take the opportunity to get any measurements we
can for the existing runway. That’ll allow you to get back
with your engineering team and tell them, this is what
they have currently in place. Things that we’re gonna
look at are rail size, runway beam size, how often
the runway is supported, as well as the runway electrification. Alright, so we’ve walked into a facility. They have an existing runway where their new crane is gonna be going. So, here we have the opportunity to actually get measurements
off of the runway beam. You won’t always have
the easiest access to it, but if they’ve got a lift or a mezzanine like we’re standing on here,
you’ll be able to measure your runway beam so that engineering knows can be taken by the runway. So what we’re gonna do,
you’ve got your runway beams. This particular runway beam
has a cap channel on it. So, we’re gonna measure all of that in order to get the information
back to engineering. So the measure of the runway height is as easy as running your
tape measure up to the top. So here, we have a 24 inch runway beam. After that, you’ll also want
to check your flange width. And we are at nine and
an eighth of an inch. And also, since we’ve got
it at the end of the runway, we can measure our
flange thickness as well. And it is three quarters of an inch. So, we’ve got the dimensions
of our runway beam. Now we want to look at
the cap channel as well. Our width is 12 inch cap channel. Measure your toe, which is three inches. And then you can also get the
thickness of the cap as well. And it is a quarter inch. So again, that’s the
information that you need to get in order to make sure that engineering has the information they need. While we’re up here, we can also measure out what our runway rail size is. That way our wheels will be sized properly so that we don’t have to
do any kind of rail changes or wheel changes after the fact. So here, it’s as easy as
measuring the head width, which is right here, and also the height. So, this rail is three
and a half inches tall and our head width is an
inch and three quarters. Again, those dimensions will allow engineering to look at
the rail sizing chart and determine what size rails that the client has in their facility. When I’m taking these measurements I always have a book and a pen in my hand, so I’m taking all these measurements now. If I have the opportunity that
somebody’s there with me from Mazzella, a crane technician
or another sales specialist, I’ve got them taking notes as well, that way we can compare
everything at the end. Another thing you also want to look at is the runway electrification. As you can see here, the
existing runway electrification has three bars, that is all three phases of your electrification. Now, NEC codes have
changed and now require a ground bar is added to any
runway that has any new cranes, hoists, or runway extension made to it. Basically, any major
modification to a crane system that has only three bars needs
to have a ground bar added. That can be done as easy as extending the bracket that holds the conductor bar and adding the ground bar. In addition, we’ll also need to wire up a ground collector to any existing crane that is on that runway. Alright, so now what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna measure span across the bay. That’ll allow us to determine what our span for the crane is gonna be. So basically, you’re gonna take your handy dandy laser again,
you’re gonna place it flush with the runway or building support. From there, you’re just gonna
hit your measure button. So you have a span of 48
and roughly nine inches. This will give you a read
out of what your span is. We’re showing right now we’ve got about 48 and 10 inch foot span. On this particular runway,
our span isn’t gonna be exactly 48 foot 10, and
that’s due to the fact that there are haunches that
come off the building supports. Basically, your runway beam is not sitting on top of the building
column, it’s on a haunch. So, you want to take a look
and you can eyeball it. Take a look at how far
off the building column the center line of your runway is. That again will allow you
to get the accurate runway. So here’s what I’m talking about
when I say building haunch. So again, your runway beam is not sitting directly on top of the column. It’s cantilevered off on this haunch. One thing you want to make sure is that you’re getting around
the correct measurement. After an order is
received, we put together approval drawings and actually can get accurate measurements of the span by running a tape or a laser
across at the runway level. But this will get you enough information to get an accurate quote. Alright, so next we’re gonna measure the runway support centers. This will allow engineering to take a look at that runway beam that
we measured previously, find out how far along
the support centers are, and then in turn check the beam to make sure it’s going to work. Again, this isn’t something that we take into account for pricing up a system, but we can make a recommendation based on our expertise
that the runway beam is or isn’t going to support the runway with a new crane on it. So what I’m gonna do, is I’m gonna measure from the web of this runway column to the web of the next column down. Again, it’ll be the same
as measuring your span. You take your handy dandy laser and you can make those measurements. You put it flush with
the web of the column. You want to make sure
you take a couple shots, make sure that everything is the same. We’re roughly 39 feet in
between building support. If you remember, we were able to measure a runway beam height because
we had a mezzanine to stand on or a lift to go up and measure the runway. In the event you don’t have that, you can get some rough measurements as to what you are working
with on the existing runway. So again, take your handy dandy laser, place it on the floor, shoot to the bottom of the runway beam, and then you can hit the inside of the cap channel, which gives you what your
height of your runway beam is. So I’m gonna do that real quick to give you an idea of
what I’m talking about. So again, you want to
be flush with the floor. Okay, so the bottom of our
runway beam is 17.4 feet. You can do the calculations afterward in case you run into problems. Now what I’m gonna do,
we’ve got a cap channel on this runway beam, I’m
gonna shoot the laser from the floor to the
bottom of the cap channel. That, minus what we’d already measured will give us what our
runway beam height is. 19.4 feet. Subtract that by the 17.4 feet, you’ve got a 24 inch runway beam. So what we’re gonna do now is measure our building clearances
in order to make sure that we’ve got all of the space we need to fit our new crane in. So, the double girder crane
or a single girder crane, you’re gonna want to know what
kind of clearances you have. We’ve already measured what
our runway beam height is, to the bottom and also to the underside of the cap channel, as
well as our rail height. So, we have an idea
already of what the floor to the top of our rail dimension is. Now what we need to get is what our floor to the clear height is,
so that we can make sure that we are not gonna hit
any building obstructions. So what I’m gonna do,
handy dandy laser again, I’m gonna take a look at a couple clearance issues we may have. We’ve got a pipe that
looks like a water pipe running across the bay, as
well as the building support and some other little water
or cap pipes running through. So we’re gonna take a
couple of those dimensions and get some clearance information. So again, you want to
make sure that your laser is flat on the floor, we’re
gonna shoot the water pipe and then also the building headers. So, we’re at 22.9 feet. Now let’s take a look at
what our building header is. So basically, what we can
discern from this is our water pipe is actually lower
than our building support. That’s gonna be our clearance. Now, when we measure out
where our crane window is, we’re gonna take from the top of that rail to the underside of that water pipe. Now, we have to take into account the three inch required Osha clearance from the top of our crane or our hoist to those water pipes. When looking at a double girder versus a single girder crane, its hook height is the paramount piece that the customer requires. You’re gonna want to
make sure that they know that a double girder crane,
while it’s more expensive, can get the better hook height because your hoist is riding
on top of the girders, as opposed to below on
the single girder crane. So, you’ll get better hook height, but again, it’s not as cost effective as a single girder crane. So again guys, there’s a couple final keys that you need to make
sure that you touch on when you’re visiting with your client. Duty cycle, duty cycle, duty cycle. You need to know how many lifts per hour and then what capacity they’re
going to be lifting at. If they have a crane that they only want a five ton capacity for, and they’re taking five ton lifts and making five to 10 lifts per hour, you’re gonna be chewing up a lot of the duty cycle on that crane. Motor start stops per
hour are another thing, and it’s going to affect
your bearing life. So, if you guys are looking
at, let’s say a 10 ton crane, and most of their lifts are only gonna be at four to five tons, that’s only 50 percent
of the crane capacity. So you can start looking at a little bit lighter duty cycle. But again, if you’re looking
at multiple capacity lifts at multiple times per hour
throughout an entire day, or even a 24 hour period of time, you really need to start looking at the crane duty cycle and making sure that we’re providing them the components because the estimators are only as smart as the information that
they’re given from the field. Another thing, again, as
you’re looking at a crane bay, you want to look at the space. Where is the crane gonna
be delivered through? How much space is the installer going to have to move through a plant? I’ve been in different plants where you’ve gotta go from one side to the other with a crane hanging off of IC-80 lift and there’s no room to get through. So, how is our installer
going to know that if we don’t tell them? You want to make sure that you’re getting all of the information possible. Timeline, when we’re gonna be
able to do the installation. Is it gonna be something
where they want us in there second or third shift when production isn’t as
high or there’s nobody there? So, the more you know, the
more our estimators know, and even the more your client knows, everybody is gonna come
out of this with a win/win. Thank you guys again,
I appreciate your time. Good luck measuring your crane and please don’t hesitate to give me a call if you’ve got any questions. We’ll see you soon.

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