HIKI NŌ: Archers to Art and other stories | Program

HIKI NŌ: Archers to Art and other stories | Program


Broadcast of HIKI NŌ are made possible by
the support of viewers like you! Mahalo! And by, Bank of Hawaii Foundation,
Investing in Hawai’i’s future by promoting collaboration, critical thinking, and
other 21st-Century skills though HIKI NŌ Kamehameha Schools, Empowering Hawaiian
Keiki to explore, discover, and inspire! ABC STORES, A Local Company Helping to transform
education and develop Hawaiʻi’s Workforce Through Bold Learning Initiatives like HIKI
NŌ Next on HIKI NŌ, stories from across our
island chain. We put the paint in, we didn’t want to get
the pallets in the parking lot all messy, so we decided to put
cardboard under it, under the balloons and gradually we decided to put watercolor paper. See how a group of innovative students figured
out how to turn archery into art. Discover a legendary rock in Waimea on Hawaiʻi
Island, which some believe saved the area from a
devastating drought. Learn how a young poet uses creativity to
battle depression. Explore a martial arts dojo that is also a
place of worship. Learn how to nourish a lost bird back to health. Meet a cultural treasure who has dedicated
her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her
community. And listen in on the inner thoughts of a young
filmmaker. All on this episode of HIKI NŌ. Coming to you from the town of Makawao and
the students at Montessori School of Maui, home of the Mustangs. That’s next on the nation’s first statewide
student news network. HIKI NŌ-can do. Aloha, we are here in the town of Makawao
at the Montessori School of Maui. Montessori schools
around the world are student-centered, so everyone learns at their own pace. Materials are used to guide
the learning. For example, sandpaper letters, originally
written on sandpaper, [INDISTINCT] children to
trace and learn the shape. Classrooms have mixed goods. Younger students can go to older ones with
a question and older students get to practice being class leaders. This helps them develop leadership skills
and independence. Our first story takes us to the island of
Kauaʻi, where students at Ke Kula Niʻihau O Kekaha public
charter school make a very convincing case for the old saying, necessity is the mother
of invention. In December 2016, Ke Kula Niʻihau O Kekaha
became the first school on Kaua’i to join the National
Archery in the Schools Program, that’s NASP, or NAS, for short. The National Archery in the Schools
Program has more than nine thousand participating schools in the U.S. and around the world. The
program follows international style target archery and uses standardized equipment throughout. Over
Christmas break, with the help of students and staff, the school built an archery range
to NAS specifications. By April 2017, the high school archery team
was ready to compete in its first NAS State Tournament. Ke Kula Niʻihau O Kekaha’s school’s kumu
tells us more about the archery program. The idea of the National Archery in the Schools
Program started out as a high school program. There
was immediate interest by other grades. From there, we decided to include our middle
school students. In the winter of 2018, we then opened up as
an elective offering of archery for our grades K to 5, and the
interest doesn’t stop there. Community interest grew as well and we have
established quarterly community archery days. Kumu Jim took us through all of the steps
necessary to participate, just as he did with all the students. How did art find its way into the archery
program? The archers to art program began when we started
shooting at balloons. We found out that the wind
blew the balloons too much, so we added water into them and we decided that we should take
a spin on things and add paint into it. When we put the paint in, we didn’t want to
get the pallets and the parking lot all messy, so we decided to put cardboard
under it, under the balloons, and gradually, we decided to
put watercolor paper. I decided to make a game out of shooting the
balloons. Whoever shoots three, the
balloon three times out of the five times is the winner. Three, two, one, shoot. Art. [MUSICAL BREAK] This is Keala Kanahele from Ke Kula Niʻihau
O Kekaha for HIKI NŌ. HIKI NŌ is now on Instagram. For show updates and a peek behind the scenes,
follow us on Instagram @hikinocando. Our next story takes us to the Waimea area
of Hawaiʻi Island where students at Hawaiʻi Preparatory
Academy middle school introduce us to a legendary rock that is said to possess special powers. [CHANTING] You know you have to believe, you have to
believe and you have to trust that the ways of the ancient
people that were here before you and were passed down to you are upright and true. In a hidden place in the small town of Waimea,
on the Big Island, a legendary pōhaku, or rock, by the
name of Mana’ua, was a savior for many people in their times of need and despair. Many Hawaiian
people believe that Mana’ua can provide a safe haven for them to practice their culture
and to perpetuate what they believe in. Aloha mai kākou o Pua Case [HAWAIIAN]. My name is Pua Case, I am born and raised
here in this community of Waimea. This is my one hānau, my birthplace, Mauna
Kea is my mountain, and I’m standing in front of Mana’ua, the rain rock
of Waimea. Mana’ua got its name from the moʻo, or lizard,
that lives in Kohākōhau stream that sunbathes on this
pōhaku with her family. There are those who still can see them and
so, when we come here, those who can see them say, oh,
Mana’ua is here. It is said that Mana’ua has the gift to bring
water to Waimea in times of need. When my father was in charge of water for
the entire ranch, you know, we went through a really, really
severe drought in 1978 and 1979 where we didn’t have any more water, if you can even believe
that in a community here, in Hawaiʻi where the only
water you have is coming out of one spigot at Church Row. Many people, like Pua Case, believe that Mana’ua
is the one responsible for bringing Waimea out of the
drought and turning it into what you see today. It is a place that we treasure, that is alive
with the prayer and offerings, and it is something that we can
teach our children. So, we made a promise in this community that
we hope to keep and we’ve been doing it for years where every student in
every school learns about Mana’ua. By learning the story of Mana’ua, the community
and students are helping preserve the story of Waimea. Wherever I am, I am at the sacred places between
Mana’ua and Mauna Kea, lies Waimea. This is Jane-Grace Cootey, from Hawaiʻi Preparatory
Academy for HIKI NŌ. We’re back at the Montessori School of Maui. At the top of a hill, on our nine-acre campus,
is the Peace Garden. It was built for students to have a calm place
in nature and a nice spot to take a break from their
work or bring work outside the classroom. It is split into three sections. Each section is intended for
different grade levels, but everyone is welcome anywhere. We take you now to the Garden Isle where students
at Kaua’i High School tell the story of a young poet
who uses his art as a way of coping with depression. Tom [INDISTINCT] says humans never stop and
realize that our lives are lives built up inside waiting
to truly come alive. Poetry to me, is an outlet. I love to write and I love to just be able
to express myself within writing. Kauaʻi High School Senior Dallas Albao, uses
poetry to cope with a personal struggle. I had to go through depression throughout
five years and things are always feeling like they’re harder
than they should be. Like, let’s just say your average late assignment,
it’s me letting down the teachers, my family, my friends, and I’ll pile on all
this stuff which makes everything much, much worse. I focus
on others more than I ever focus on myself. The way I overcome all of this dilemma would
be through poetry. Being able to tell them how it is I’m feeling
and throughout all of my time, I’ve always looked
for someone that can understand what it is I feel. Just as, you know, weight-lifting is an outlet
to me, all this stuff, it’s a way for me to just share
my heart, I’ll share all that I’m feeling, my, just every last bit of
me I get to share all within one story. For Dallas, media class has inspired and generated
a new level of poetry. Recently, I just did the ʻŌlelo video. I made sure I took a video of something that
really connects to me and would be representative of what it is
I’m trying to tell. So, what I chose was the moon. [AUDIO
PLAYS] [INDISTINCT] lightness of gas burning all that stemmed. Take into mind, I’m a nice guy
doing nice things at the wrong time. Everyone in here sees me as a calm but never
bothered to see what’s behind this mask [INDISTINCT]. [SPEAKER BACK] So, there’s times where you’ll
see the full moon glisten within the sky and it’ll always
be there and it’ll always lighten your way, but then there’s
times when the clouds will roll in and the light will kinda get blurred, but you can
still see the light. Dallas says his own life has been much brighter
these days. Lately, I’ve been a lot happier. When I’m talking to one of my friends, I’ll
be talking to them and we’ll be having all these different laughs and it’s
something that I can feel happy about, that at least I’m
getting to do something for them that they get to live a little happier within their
days. Through the tough times in life, Dallas hopes
that his words can help and inspire others. What I plan on doing is hopefully going to
school or just traveling the world, sharing my story or telling
a tale for people to connect with and grow with. This is Tiffany Sagucio from Kauaʻi High
School for HIKI NŌ. Now from the HIKI NŌ archives. Here’s another story about using self-expression
to deal with mental health issues. I actually used to self-harm myself. I got it right there on my left arm so that
every time I have the feeling of hurting myself, I can look at it
and it’ll remind myself to stay strong. For 18-year old Kahului resident, Kawena Kekuewa,
her floral tattoo serves as a reminder of her self-
inflicted cuts and the person she once was. There were so many things that went wrong
in 2018 and I honestly thought I couldn’t take it anymore. I
did a lot of things that I wasn’t proud about. When I’d finally hit my lowest point, it was
eye-opening to me. [SINGING] Cause none of it was ever worth
the risk. [SPEAKER BACK] I finally admitted to
myself that I have a mental health problem and I finally wanted to get better. Getting better took many creative forms for
Kawena. [AUDIO PLAYING] The first step to getting
over your ex is to get rid of everything that reminds you of
them. [SPEAKER BACK] YouTube has definitely given
me that voice that I thought I would never have. It’s given me an outlet where I could actually
speak my mind and I’ve spent almost all of my life
caring about what other people thought and I have gotten to the point where in my life
where I don’t care what other people say anymore. I just keep doing the things that I love to
do. That’s all that matters. A healthy network of friends has also served
as a catalyst for change. This was a letter from one of my best friends
on my 18th birthday. [READS] I really wish for you to be
happy, Kawena, whatever it takes. I will help you through it. [SPEAKER BACK] Now I know that I’m
never truly alone. I know there is someone I can always turn
to and that gives me satisfaction and just hope. Now, Kawena’s hope thrives. In the video she creates, [VIDEO PLAYS]: so
I’m not going to lie, I really love having my short hair…her friends, and
the life that she lives today. This is Joshua Lee from Maui High School for
HIKI NŌ. If you, or someone you know, is dealing with
urges to self-harm, you can find help at www dot crisis
text line dot org. We’re back in Makawao at the Montessori School
in Maui. School can be tough. Students sometimes
fear not completing their work on time, but mindfulness can help students with this issue. Mindfulness is
a practice used to calm down and clear the mind to decrease stress and anxiety. We do mindfulness by
sitting on cushions with good posture and legs crossed. We warm up by stretching and doing a self-
awareness check in. Then, we do five to ten minutes of guided
breathing exercise while listening to soft meditation music. Three ohms close the session. We remain on the Valley Isle for a story from
students at Kamehameha School’s Maui Middle School
about a special place where self-defense and worship come together under one roof. CJ Reyes has two loves: jiu jitsu and sharing
his faith in God. I’ve been into jiu jitsu for seven years and
I’ve been teaching the martial art for four years. It’s been
making a big impact, especially on some of the kids. But CJ and his group not only work on the
motor skills of their students, they also work on their spiritual
side as well. What we do is we share devotions before our
classes and throughout different events that we have going
on. I’ve been using that to…as a platform to
share God’s love and God’s truth with my community. [AUDIO] So my title says the [INDISTINCT]… And thus, the name of their program, New Creation
Jiu Jitsu, was born. So, our program, New Creation Jiu Jitsu, is
founded on the scripture second Corinthians five-seventeen,
which says, for anyone who’s in Christ, he’s a new creation, all things have passed away,
behold all things have become new. His drive to help others wasn’t always his
goal, but this local boy from Molokaʻi was inspired by a
childhood angel who changed his life forever. I was growing up, there was this lady, she
came from, uh, I think it was California, I believe, and she
would come summertime to do activities with the kids and the kids would just love her. She would, uh,
write down our birthdays and she would send a dollar to each of the kids. Can you imagine a dollar? It
was about a hundred bucks, maybe? If anything…was a lot of money. But she would do that out of the
kindness of her heart and to me, that was really big. So, when I gave my life to the Lord, God reminded
me of that time, and so that’s why using jiu jitsu to share about Him. This woman and her scriptures motivated him
to create his own acronym that mirrors his beliefs. We have a saying in New Creation Jiu Jitsu,
it’s called ROLL, and it stands for Respect, Order,
Leadership, and Love. In jiu jitsu we roll, so, meaning, we shake
hands and we actively practice these, these moves that we learn, and it’s also our
pillar, our four pillars which we use in our, in our program,
to help people to remember what we’re all about. The Reyes family hopes that in the future,
their program would grow. [FEMALE SPEAKER]: We would really love to
see New Creation have its own home, a building where
we could say, ok, this is New Creation Jiu Jitsu. And our heart and our desire is to reach out
to our community. So, we have connections in all different
areas and, um, it’s just a matter of time when the Lord’s going to take us there to
share this program with other people. This is Rylee Rosenthal from Kamehameha Schools
Maui for HIKI NŌ. And now, from students at ‘Īao School in
Wailuku, Maui. Here’s a how-to video that would make St.
Francis of Assisi very proud. In the springtime, it’s common to come across
a baby bird while having a stroll in the park. Baby birds
will develop in the months of mid-April through September. If you happen to come across an abandoned
baby bird, here are some easy steps to help you take care of it. First, check the bird for any injuries. Make sure there isn’t any blood or other wounds. If there is,
carefully bring it to a vet or the Humane Society. Next, determine if the bird is a hatchling,
nestling, or fledgling. A hatchling hasn’t opened its eyes yet
and hasn’t developed any feathers. A nestling has its eyes opened but has very
few tube-like feathers. A
fledgling is fully feathered and can walk, hop and flutter. It cannot fully fly yet. Knowing the age of the bird is important so
you give it the appropriate food. After you have determined
if the bird is a hatchling, nestling or a fledgling, carefully place the bird in a container
with airholes to take it home. Make sure to have a home ready for the baby
bird. You can use a wide variety of materials. Just double check that the bird has enough
room to move around and breathe. You can create your own
nest with old cut grass and a bowl. The home should be enclosed so the bird doesn’t
escape. Go to your local pet store to buy baby bird
food. Make sure to follow the directions on the
package. Use
a syringe to feed the bird. Remember to feed it until it refuses to eat. Feed the bird every two to three
hours. Once the bird is fully fledged, you can start
feeding it mealworms. When your bird is ready to be
freed and can fly, release your feathery friend back into the wild. This is Penelope Dolin from ‘Īao School for
HIKI NŌ. We take you now to the Kalihi district of
Oʻahu, where students at Farrington High School introduce us
to a graduate from the Class of 1962 who continues to keep the Japanese culture alive in her
community. Enter to learn, go forth to serve. Betty Santoki, born in Japan, raised in Hawaiʻi,
always had a heart for her community. Graduated from Farrington High School, Class
of 1962 and with the motto-enter to learn, go forth to serve-which she still abides
by to this day. She has helped her community due to
teaching of the Japanese culture. So when I came to Hawai’i, I was enrolled
in a school and there was no ESL at the time, so I was put
into a classroom and expected to do, learn as the other students. I was very fortunate because the teacher
I had in first grade knew some Japanese, so it made it much easier for me. I grew up in a Japanese family environment,
so of course it was respect, respect for elders. Um, it’s
oyakoko, it’s being filial piety, to serve, uh, to serve and to help your parents, um,
and “on” which is like obligation to others who have helped you,
so you should have a return kind of feeling to help them, and I
think this is the way I can serve the community. For the past six years, she has been teaching
Japanese conversation classes at the Newtown Community
Center to interested seniors with the intent of connecting them to their roots, to give
them a sense of “on” so they appreciate the sacrifices their ancestors
made for them. Seniors in the class, you know, we travel
a lot to Japan, so we really benefited from her teaching us. We
don’t know our ancestors, our family, you know, in Japan. So, through Betty, she’s able to write letters,
converse Japanese, so she’s helping us make connections. A few months ago, Betty had a heart surgery,
so this was in April, April-May, and so, but in the fall, she still had a class. Of course, we helped her, a
lot of the preparation and planning, and Betty still did it. You know, she still carried on, she still
felt responsible. For Betty Santoki, the importance of “on”
is being part of something bigger than herself. She aspires to
help people learn the language and also about their culture, giving them a bigger sense
of self through teaching about the Japanese culture. This is Drake Dela Cruz from Farrington High
School, for HIKI NŌ. We’re back in the town of Makawao at the Montessori
School of Maui. Our school has a garden with a compost program
that generates high quality compost from raw materials
collected in classroom and in the environment. This program gives us the opportunity to learn
about how compost is made and how it is used. Middle school students built multiple wooden
bins where the compost is cultivated. We’ll use the compost produced in our garden
to help sustain the plants. We will
also sell it as merchandise in our Koa Store for students and parents. For our final story, we’ll stay here on the
island of Maui and delve into the thoughts of an H.P. Baldwin
high school student, who wondered if great things can actually find their start in the
quiet suburbs of where she lives. I grew up in the same house in the same small,
confined neighborhood my entire life, with an
imagination that drove me to believe that I could be anything I wanted to be. But having big dreams in such a small place
felt completely out of reach because I didn’t feel like the
place I was living in was significant enough for big dreamers to succeed from, and somehow
maybe I would travel far away to a place where dreams
came true, but I was stuck. Though I did create my own
fun because I still enjoyed the memories I made with the people I loved. My younger self always thought that my neighborhood
would never change, that my friends and I would
be in our own little world forever. We used to ride our bikes along familiar pathways
but pretended we were on a new adventure every day. But now, I sit at my desk struggling to complete
my homework because I’m staring out of my window thinking
about how euphoric my childhood was. One of the best moments from when I was a
kid was when I got a dog. Dogs see life through a different
perspective than humans. They see the choices we make and not how we
reflect on them, and my dog, Avalon, always sees the best in me. He gave me a new perspective, one through
a lens. I started taking pictures of her and sharing
them on social media. Over time, it became a hobby, and
eventually, when I was twelve, my dad got me my first camera. From then on, I discovered I wanted to
work with cameras for the rest of my life. I ended up venturing into the world of cinematography
and filmmaking where I could tell my stories. When I was younger, I used to write my own
scripts and film terrible videos with my friends, using my
old computer. But I never thought anything of it, because
at that time, working in the film industry was a
fantasy, only the lucky ones could live in it. That doesn’t matter anymore. I want to live in that world, too. Because we’re all stories at the end of the
day, and someone needs to tell it, even if it’s told by some nostalgic girl sitting at
her desk in her same old house in the same small, confined neighborhood. Well, we’ve come to the end of this episode
of HIKI NŌ. Remember, all these stories were written,
shot and edited by students like us. We hope that you’ve enjoyed watching them
as much as we’ve enjoyed sharing them with you. Tune in next week for more proof that Hawai’i’s
young people HIKI NŌ. Can do. [END] HIKI NO 1101.mp3 Page 1 of 9

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