Creating a UX Design Portfolio Case Study

Creating a UX Design Portfolio Case Study


Design portfolios are a hot topic in the UX world. Regardless of where your portfolio
lives or how you created it, there’s one thing that we can all agree on: it’s not just about the pretty pictures. The people who are viewing your portfolio want to know more about the projects, how you fit in and the process you followed
to get you to the final result. We communicate this information
through case studies. Let’s walk through seven steps to laying out a case study in your UX design portfolio. Number one. Talk about the design problem and the hypothesis
you came up with for solving it. What problems did you observe
while watching users? What did your stakeholders ask you to build? Was there a difference between what
you heard versus what you saw? How did you set yourself up to solve that problem? Second, talk about your specific role and how you
collaborated with others on your team. Rarely are we ever alone on our own UX island. Potential employers want to hear how
you collaborate with others, and how your work integrates with
the rest of a cross-functional team. You can talk about your facilitation skills here and how your work impacted the team. Next, introduce your solution
and how you came up with it. This is where your pretty pictures come in, whether those are screen shots
or high fidelity mock-ups. In addition to the pretty pictures, explain how
you came to the ultimate decision that this was going to be the
best solution for your users. Fourth. Talk about how your solutions solve the problem. What can your users do now
that they couldn’t do before? How does this solution change
their daily life? Next talk about the challenges you’ve faced. Were there additional design concepts that
you came up with that you can show here? Sketches, journey maps, and photos from
workshops or usability testing give a sneak peek into the
nitty-gritty of your process. This is what potential employers want to see. It may feel messy and unfinished to you, but this is the bulk of your process,
and it’s incredibly important for people who are trying to envision
what it’s like to work with you. The sixth step in your case study is communicating how the project
affected users and the business. Did you notice an increase
in user satisfaction? Or an increase in adoption
or engagement? Use tangible numbers here whenever possible. And finally, talk about what you learned. This can be for you personally, or lessons that the team learned about how
to work on projects like this in the future. When you finish creating a case study
for your portfolio, seek feedback from those who view it, whether
they’re colleagues or interviewers. Another set of eyes on your portfolio will
help catch spelling and grammar errors, confusion about content and the overall
usability of the format you chose. Your portfolio will always be a work in progress. Be prepared to iterate on it until it works for you.

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