Between Worlds | KQED Truly CA

Between Worlds | KQED Truly CA


Narrator: A KQED
television production. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ [ Waves crashing ] Amador: All explorers are
going through the same thing. Looking around that next bend
and seeing — seeing what’s beyond
just that next horizon, or what’s it look like
from up on top of this. And you discover
a whole new thing. In those moments, when you
just looked around the bend, and something new came
into focus in the body or in the mind. I think I live
for those moments. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: My name’s Henthorne. I’m a black-and-white,
long-exposure photographer. I started shooting
about 15 years ago. I actually started off doing
some underwater photography is actually where
my career first started. You know, I started traveling. People wanted to see
and share my experiences. And I was so passionate
about diving. I really wanted to share this
underwater world with people. And as people started to really
like some of the stuff and buy a print here and there,
that’s really where I was, like, “Hmm, I’m gonna have to
get a lot, lot better if people are gonna
buy my stuff.” We’re all products
of our experiences, and, you know, a lot of this has
to do with how I was brought up. I mean, my father was very much
a perfectionist, and there’s always an adage of,
if you’re gonna do something, you absolutely do it
to the best. The best that you can. ♪♪ You know, I live in Tampa because two of my three
siblings live here, and we live in extremely
close proximity to each other. And we’re very close. My family is all very,
very tight. Personally, Tampa’s not
quite metropolitan enough for my art scene, so to speak. I need a little bit bigger city with a little bit
more art savvy to it. So it’s been tough.
It’s been tough staying here. It’s hard as an artist,
no matter who you are, to make it here. ♪♪ On the other hand, you know,
that’s the — that’s the con. The pro is, I get up every
morning, and you know, I’m on the water, and I get
to see the ocean every day. And for me, that’s everything. ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: Well, my background
is in sciences. And so for most of my life, I felt that that would be
the direction I would go. Something very serious,
fact-based, grounded in reality. And the movement towards
doing art kind of came out of left field. It took me by surprise that
that’s what started to emerge. So, I was studying geometry,
and I was on the beach one day, and I was showing
a friend things I’d been learning about
ancient architecture. And suddenly, I realized
that I could create big designs on the beach. So, I was doing them
mostly geometrically, and then I started
moving more towards what I had been doing
in the sculptural work was components that
created larger things. It’s just been an evolution
from there. ♪♪ ♪♪ Art seems to have an aesthetic
quality to it, a component, but it’s in the eye
of the beholder. So it’s someone expressing
themselves, whatever that is. Cooking, music, visual,
woodworking. But it has to do
with reaching — something’s being drawn out. Something’s being conveyed. There is a journey
that is being expressed. There’s someone’s experience
that’s being transmitted. So it’s not just that
they’re a good woodworker. The fact that they’re
transmitting something as they do it,
and then it becomes an art form. But anything is art. The Japanese, the art of flower
arranging, of anything. When you take it
to the next level, then something else
is being transmitted that’s not the thing itself. I was on a beach
when it occurred to me what was possible
on a beach canvas. So the beach, I suppose,
elicited the art. And once I began doing the art,
a few years into it, I started seeing ways that
I could move outside the beach and do it anywhere. Because it’s not
about the beach, but I keep getting
drawn back to the beach because it is such
a vast, amazing canvas. And such amazing locations
that I can’t turn it down. ♪♪ ♪♪ I found other ways to use
natural materials and natural settings
to do large-scale artwork. And really, that’s kind of
the essence of what I’m doing. But that takes lots
of materials. You need lots of space. You can’t just jump in your car,
go to a place, and then be able to do it. But I can go to the beach, and I can do something
huge right away. And there’s a deep sense
of satisfaction in creating something so large. And that’s kind of what
keeps drawing me back is that satisfaction
of creating something so big. ♪♪ ♪♪ Every so often,
I’ll have these — these moments of just
intense anxiety. What will the future hold,
and how long can this — can this, you know,
boat stay afloat? So far, the work
has come as commissions, and I do workshops. But they’re haphazard. Only in this past year
has it been enough to become my full-time work, or that I’m relying
solely on that. And then now we have a child,
and now it feels real. It feels that all of this now,
it’s not a game any more. Just fear that I will have
to get a regular job to do something that is more reliable
and offer more security. And perhaps that’s my biggest
fear is compromising — I’m not sure
what I’m compromising. Compromising my spirit. The spirit’s path. And then Ember, it was such
a beautiful moment — Ember just kind of, like,
soothed my brow and just said, “There is no security.” DeQuincy: My — my feel is
that there aren’t any securities or any safeties in this life. Whether it be an artist’s life
or whether it be working in tech or in a bank or whatever. Owning our own business
or working for somebody else, no matter how stable
it might seem, things happen. And any sense of safety that we
have are really just illusions that we create for ourselves. Amador: [ Exhales deeply ] I just felt this weight
just lifting off, and even though
I still carry that — the weight of that burden,
I can still feel it, it doesn’t impinge me
in what I do. I don’t feel it holding me back. So it’s still there,
but it’s not crippling like it had been in periods. ♪♪ Well, Jason connected with me. He was impressed with the art and thought that he could
bring a unique vision to it. Henthorne: You know,
I saw his earthscapes and was just absolutely
taken with it. Instantly, a light bulb went off of what a phenomenal
collaboration this could be to tie in what he does
with what I do. I’m so used to being halfway
around the world and being solo. And it’s a very easy dynamic because the only person
to screw it up is me, basically. I got to thinking, okay,
it’s not only gonna be Andrés. It’s gonna be his wife
and their 4-month-old child that I have with us. I was, like, boy,
this could be really — This could get really — Not complicated,
not dicey, but just — I can see us not getting
a lot of work done. DeQuincy: Yeah, it makes it
tricky, and two artists who are, like, very strong in their art. Yeah. And have a clear vision
and to find the place in between to bring
that together, it’s tricky. It’s tricky. Amador: So the first trip
was kind of getting a sense of each of us needs. There were some great
beaches that we were on, but it was all pebbles. And it just — my art wouldn’t
show up on it at all. And there were some great
beaches with perfect sand, but there was
no nice composition. And so it wouldn’t work for him. Henthorne: You really, really
have to learn to improvise and to do with what you have. Amador: He needs to have
the narrow window of a certain time of day
where the sun’s just right. But then he also is looking
for a composition in a way that I just can’t — I can’t afford that
unless I wanted to cross out almost all the beaches
that I work on. And so that leaves a subset
that is very narrow of time and space. It’s really tricky. ♪♪ What we had happening here was
that there’s all those heavy, like, large pebbles, right?
So… Henthorne: Was that
the same stuff as we had? Amador: Basically,
the same thing, yeah. Henthorne: Okay, okay,
which is why you’re not super excited about this spot. Amador: Well, you know, I think
we need to be able to work with this kind
of possibility, and so — But the area — this area here
is all really nice. This is all really great sand. Henthorne: That’s the
foreground, so that’s like — I mean, obviously you’re not
gonna do it like this, but you were drawing
these this way. But what if they were
all this way? So that we have a lot of
contrast, you know, headed through the shot. I mean, I know
this wasn’t your shot, but something where the design’s
more laid out. Amador: So… Henthorne: Are you erasing
all my beautiful marks? [ Laughs ] Amador: So something that
kind of just creates a field that goes out this way. You know, we’ll just play
with these things and just see how they look,
and that’ll refine the process. I mean, that’s really
how it works. Henthorne: Another good day.
Let’s do it. [ Speaking indistinctly ] [ Waves crashing ] Amador: Oh, boy. Henthorne: It becomes really
apparent really quickly that we will not be
working with this. Amador: Yow! Henthorne:
I can get it from up here. I’m really thinking,
like, that one. One of those two. Amador: So, what do we — Henthorne: Just where those cars
are parked right there. Amador: Okay, all right. Man. The storm brought it up. Henthorne: This is what
I expected the days to be like out here. Windy. Rough. I don’t know. I’d say those are 8
to 10-footers crawling in. It’s what I like.
It’s just a question now of, is this gonna be
the right sand for Andrés? Amador: Wow, I haven’t
tried to do this in these kinds
of conditions before. First for everything.
Henthorne: What? This is the first?
Amador: Yeah, it is. DeQuincy:
In rain like this, yeah. Amador: Okay, man. DeQuincy: Okay, let’s go.
Henthorne: Let’s rock it. DeQuincy: Right, baby? Henthorne:
Fortunately for me today, I get to sit in the van
a little bit more while he’s out doing his thing. But as always, tides change. When he gets done,
and it’s time for me to roll. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: It was burly down there. It was interesting, like,
the scale down there. Something might seem really big, but it’s not that big
when you get back from it. I would have done things
differently. I would like to
do this one again, and just, like,
make it be wider, and I would make a tool so I could make
a trail all at once as opposed to
one down the middle and then trying to go on
either side of it. That kind of —
it disrupts the flow. The more I focus
on a particular outcome, then the less fun it can — than it is because then the
pressure’s on to achieve that. Jason’s still out there
in the cold, and all I want to do
is go back and fix it, but it’s not possible. It’s almost part of the reason
that I stopped trying to get people to photograph
or to come out because I don’t know
if it’ll be worth their while. I don’t know. It’s just easier to — if I’m disappointed
with the piece, and that’s as far as it goes,
that’s fine. But the more people
get involved, and the more effort
that’s required and all that,
then it’s harder for me when it doesn’t work out right. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: There is moments
where it is work, and there it could feel
like drudgery, or there’s the pressure. Whenever I feel any kind
of thing arise, tension arise, I just step back and just —
I mean, it doesn’t take — I don’t have to reach
very far at all to come back
to a place of gratitude for the circumstances
in my life. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ I’m very aware of
how little time I have and how much beach
I have to cover. And usually I bite off more
than the time that would be
realistic for that. And so I end up, like,
really jamming at the end. Henthorne: First of all,
without Ember helping him on some of the designs — because sometimes
the tide goes out so fast, or we have such a small window,
or he does, to create, to make the design and get it before the sun sets. So sometimes,
Ember has to help him. ♪♪ Amador: People say that
they feel tranquil when they watch it happen. But to be on the beach
right next to me and seeing the process
that I’m going through, I think you might start
to feel a little frantic, too. ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne:
With capturing Andrés’ work, it added a whole new
set of challenges that I think
we both really like. For me, from the photography
standpoint, it was really about capturing
such an impermanent thing. ♪♪ ♪♪ This is not gonna — this is not gonna make
daddy happy here at all. It’s a nice — It’s, like,
perfect blue sky over here where we need it to be
and, like, I think we’re
gonna get drenched. And I always like
getting my cameras wet. Well, I’m definitely gonna
have to remeasure all this. [ Laughs ] Oh! It’s like I’ve got a bunch
of complex factors, and now he’s got a bunch
of complex factors. So finding the right spot
to do all this in is definitely a challenge. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ DeQuincy: I think his art
is beautiful. I think it’s amazing
what flows through him. I think it’s amazing how he can
be so inside of something and have such a sense
of what he’s creating. I don’t quite have that for
something so large-scale, even after working
with him for so long. ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: It’s really been
great so far working with Andrés. It’s awesome to not
only watch what he does, but it’s really kind of nice
having both of us pair off of each other
and pick these — pick the right spots
and work on the designs, you know, collaboratively. ♪♪ Amador: When I do
these group artworks, I appreciate that,
if it were just me, there’d be a singular voice
that comes through. But it would be very
recognizable, perhaps, or very static in a way
because it’s so consistent. Whereas when there’s
many people involved, then nuances emerge that
is the collective voice that is far richer
than what I might create. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: I want to do
that piece so bad. How does he get down? Man: Well, you wait till the
tide goes out in an hour or so. Amador: Wow, wow, wow, wow.
I love it. Man: You can come
through the cave. It’s easy.
Amador: That’s amazing. DeQuincy: Andrés is juiced. Well, it would be
such a cool spot, too, because you could do
a design on both sides, and that would make
such a great flyover. Amador: Dude,
just to feel this thing. Just to fill this whole
little bowl right here. It’s pretty cool. I mean, there’s a lot
of opportunities here. Henthorne: Yeah. The game plan is, we’re gonna —
we’re gonna do two designs here. One on this side,
and as the tide goes out, it’s gonna be something
super simple. We’re getting ready to work on. As the tide goes out,
we’re gonna make that corner, come through the cave, and do
the bigger beach over here. ♪♪ Amador: Okay? All right. Let’s see what happens. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: Amador, Amador. Come in, Amador. Amador, do you read me? Come in. Well, I’m a little worried. Actually, we just finished up
design number one. We’re getting ready
to do design number two, and we’ve got to go around
this whole peninsula and cut through a cave. And we have to cut through right
when the wave’s all the way out. Amador and Ember have been
missing for about, I don’t know, 5 or 10 minutes. I can’t get them on the radio. They won’t answer, so I
don’t know where they’re at. So, I think we need
to go find them. I hope they haven’t — I hope something hasn’t
happened to them. Let’s go get them. I have not been able to raise
Amador for about 20 minutes now. And I’m definitely getting
a little worried about them. See them? Really? Why didn’t you guys… There they are. I’ve been calling them
for 20 minutes, and they’re just at
the edge of the cliff. Must have had the radio off
or on another channel. Emergency avoided. Guys. We were, like, really
worried about you. I’ve been calling you on
the radio for, like, 20 minutes. Amador: No.
DeQuincy: Really? Henthorne: Yeah.
Amador: That’s weird. Henthorne: And I couldn’t
see you here, and you didn’t come out
over there, and I couldn’t see you here. Amador: Strange. Henthorne: ‘Cause I thought
you were gonna — Amador: ‘Cause I got
your last message. I got your last transmission
to Andrés. DeQuincy: Yeah,
we were hearing you. Henthorne: I was worried
that we might not have a second design today. [ Laughs ] I was worried that I was gonna
have to rake and shoot today. DeQuincy: Oh, man.
Harsh. Amador: Your fears have
been alleviated, yeah. Henthorne:
They’ve been relieved? Thank you, thank you. ‘Cause I know — I’ve seen what
happens when you try to rake and shoot. Amador: I’ve seen what happens
when you try to rake. DeQuincy: Oh.
Henthorne: You’ve seen me rake. Kavi, do you believe
this sarcasm? Do you believe that? Do you believe that? ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: The first design,
’cause we had really good light, it was awesome. Amador: I really
like that motif. Henthorne: The circles?
Amador: Yeah, just so simple. I’m looking forward
to seeing those pictures. Henthorne: So I thought
I lost you today. Radio silence. Amador: Yeah, sorry about that. Henthorne: That’s all right. Amador: That was a glitch
in the matrix. ♪♪ Henthorne:
I love to make it feel as though what I’m doing
just bleeds off the frame, and that is the reality. ♪♪ When I first started
doing the artwork, I was doing the more
geometric designs, and I would go, boom,
there is this piece, and it’s kind of
like it’s framed by the edges of the picture. But it kind of exists
in the center of the picture. When I started going
a more organic route, the frame started
to cut the picture. So I was —
I’m cropping the image so it just looked like the design was just
permeating the world. That’s what existed,
which I think is really cool. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: So, letting
go of reality and stepping into imagination. It forced us to look
at things in new ways. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: We’ve kind of been,
hey, from up here, trying to get this massive
expanse of a kind of thing. Granted, in places like Thornton
and Half Moon Bay, that is the choice. But I think up here, maybe
sometimes instead of, you know, if this is the whole beach,
and this is the whole design. Instead of trying to get up here
and shoot the whole thing, I want us to more like get over
here and just shoot this slice. Amador: We don’t need to —
to make the beach art be like this grand thing,
like, look at this. But also, look at all this.
It’s cool. Henthorne: Right, it’s just — Amador: Right, it’s like
an accent on the beach. You know, we’ve been
kind of approaching it from this big reaction thing. But I think that’s —
that’s what this is. It’s letting that go. Henthorne: Every time we’ve
shot smaller and smaller, it’s worked out
better and better. Amador: Yeah. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: I’m trying to
align things on the beach as they will look on the camera. Henthorne: Okay, then you go — Amador: ‘Cause you just
get one shot at this. Henthorne: Just so you know
what’s out of frame. From me to that little stick
right there that’s on the beach, that’s out. So you can walk anywhere
out that direction. Amador: Okay, so set it down. Henthorne: Oh, no,
it needs to be — you need to almost be out there. You need to make sure
and stay, yeah, on the — on that beach line right there. ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: So, I’m not gonna
try to end there. I’m just gonna go like this
and keep going that way. Okay, cool. Henthorne: Your first thing
was like this, and all I’m seeing is like this. Amador: So not like this. Not like that. Henthorne: Yeah.
Amador: This has a direction. This is all these different,
like, bends in the river, right? This is going around
mountain peaks or something. This would be a very —
kind of a straight trajectory, even though it’s curving
around it, right? That makes sense? So, okay. So there are a number
of challenges there that we saw during the course of this. His perspective means
that I’m creating it for what he will see, which is a very different
approach than I would ever do. And because of it,
I’ve started to think about what is my final shot. When I start to
approach something, what are we ultimately
going to get, then how should we
adjust things as a result? And that really
started with Jason. ♪♪ I appreciate when my art
is part of something else. So it’s not just about,
look at my art. Look at this thing,
although that’s fine. But I really appreciate
when it can be the stage for something else. ♪♪ This place is really cool.
It’s really dramatic. The ocean really
is amazing right now. And we’re contending with a lot
of unexpected circumstances. [ Engine revving ]
It’s this — Henthorne: This is good? It’s good in the background? Amador: This place is —
[ Engine revving ] Henthorne:
I couldn’t pick someplace more out in
the middle of nowhere, but yet, it’s not. Amador: Right. I believe today is
Super Bowl Sunday, and — So I won’t say anything
to get myself in trouble. But I’m surprised
they’re out here. And then also, the beach is
so flat still that the low tide isn’t getting low enough,
and it’s not draining. And so there’s tons
of potential beach, but it’s still very moist. So a lot of it’s not usable,
and so that’s really — that’s affecting our options. The sand, it looks
like it’s alive. It pauses for a moment
when I rake through it, and then it starts to crumble
in like it’s, like, returning itself
back into the earth. It’s really wacky. It’s cool. And it’s a little frustrating. I think since we’re so limited, we should just try
several different things and just kind of keep it tight. Henthorne: Yeah.
Amador: I mean, even like that. If there was a spot
where we could just get… Just to see what it’s like. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: Little ear holes. DeQuincy: All right. You’re ready now. Mama can still work with Papa, and I don’t have to worry
about an umbrella. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador:
The beach is being swallowed up by these massive waves. We have a little sliver
right here, so yeah. It’s gnarly out there. Henthorne: Want to go down
and look at it? Amador: Go down a little lower? Henthorne: We’ll go down
the steps right here. Amador: Yeah, sure. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: I can’t believe
how much this has gone down since we were out
here an hour ago. So we’re still an hour
and a half off of high/low tide. Amador: I can rake rain
or shine, so I’m good. I’m good, no matter what. Henthorne: So we got
our design picked out, so I’m gonna set up the tripods. Get you set up with
how wide the shot is. I’m gonna leave
the tripods out there, swing back over here
with the camera, get everything dried off. You make the design,
then I can come out there and hammer the shot. Amador: Sounds good.
Henthorne: Game plan’s done. Amador: All right. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ DeQuincy:
Yeah, so the first round
that we finished the piece, probably within a couple
of minutes, big waves came in and just took out
a majority of the piece. That actually
was kind of awesome because we had had a chance
just to look at it a little bit and see the places where it was, like, oh, making a move like that doesn’t really make
a very interesting mark. Amador: Actually, we were having
so much fun actually doing it that it just gives us
an opportunity to go and do it again, which is fun. Every time we could do it,
we were actually practicing it as we’re doing it. Yeah, we almost feel
elated on this one. The conditions are so intense
that it’s kind of an adrenaline just being in its presence. It’s not as massive. It’s one of the small designs, but I think
the angles he was getting, it’s gonna look really cool. I’m appreciating
that the project seems to be moving towards, how do we work with
the conditions that we’re given? Right now, the project
has that feeling like we’re all working on
that kind of wavelength. That feels good. It doesn’t feel
the heaviness of, uhh, another day kind of squandered. DeQuincy: Yeah, and it kind of
makes it to where the rain which sometimes
can feel unpleasant, it doesn’t seem to be
an issue at all. Just, yeah. It feels like we’re playing
and enjoying each other and enjoying what we’re doing. ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: Look at how
the weather changed. I like this clouds.
I love those right there. That’s, like, couldn’t ask
for anything more. Amador: Oh, wow, cool. DeQuincy: They look like
they show up in your shots. Henthorne: I don’t even
have to do anything. I can just take regular shots
with that stuff. I don’t need to do
long exposure. ♪♪ Amador: It’s ephemeral art.
It’s meant to go away. You make it, and then it’s gone. That’s kind of the idea. I can’t really be upset
about that, but it’s really the pressure
to create the expectations for something to be produced. That’s where it becomes hard. I found myself getting
really frustrated that Jason’s perspective
could not encompass the work that I was creating. It felt like the imagery was
just not reaching its potential. It’s very frustrating
and had me questioning, what am I doing with this? And it was towards the end
that we decided to stop trying
to get the big thing and just go for —
go more intimate. And that was a huge
turning point for me. That started to happen really
towards the end of the project. Henthorne: The actual
between worlds I think is actually starting to happen. Before, we thought it’s him
bringing what he can do and me bringing what I have, and, you know, the beach thing
and the earth and sea thing. And now it’s coming together. But I think now,
we’re both starting to come towards the middle to someplace that neither of us
has really been before. So, we’re kind of meeting
between both of our worlds. And that’s really cool. Henthorne: So.
Amador: Wow. Henthorne: This is the end
of this part. DeQuincy: This part. Henthorne: Certainly
not the end of — Amador: Not a farewell. Henthorne: But not a farewell,
not at all. DeQuincy: Five successful trips,
a lot of days together. Henthorne:
A lot of days together. Lots of interesting times. DeQuincy: A lot of chef Amador. Henthorne:
Yeah, yeah, absolutely. See you soon. I’ll give you guys a double hug. DeQuincy: Ohhh. Henthorne: Bye, little buddy. Bye, buddy. Don’t eat too many strange
things the next couple weeks. DeQuincy: [ Laughs ]
Amador: Be careful. Let’s get it packed up. Henthorne: Time to go.
DeQuincy: Here we go. ♪♪ Henthorne: The art, the prints
are exactly like I wanted them, and that’s a big piece of it. Because there’s all this work
that we put in ahead of time. But the final thing’s
the print on the wall upstairs in the gallery, and does that look like
how I wanted it to? And they absolutely do. And for me as an artist,
that makes it. ♪♪ ♪♪ Henthorne: This is the night. This is it all coming together
right here tonight. The almost year of work
of putting this series of “Between Worlds” together. Amador: This is definitely
a milestone in — In everything I’ve done, this is
a culmination point, absolutely. ♪♪ Man: I thought
they were amazing. I’m a photographer myself, and I
find them really inspiring. Woman: I’ve never seen
anything like it. It’s very unusual. Chasez: I like the idea
of kind of these pictures — you have a window of time
to get them before they get washed away. Essentially,
you’re looking at something that will only be there
for a period of time, and then it’ll be gone forever,
which is kind of fun. Woman #2: You know, even though
the work is fleeting because it gets washed
out by the tide, and for us to be able
to see the images and it’s kind of
forever encapsulated for different generations
to enjoy, it’s amazing. Man #2: I really think
they’re phenomenal. Woman #3:
That people can come together and create things like this, it’s a beautiful thing. [ Camera shutter clicks ] ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Amador: Something that’s emerged
from this project is the ability to, well, design a project
that actually has a goal. I’d never done that before. I was always just, I’m gonna do
this design, and then this one. And they really didn’t have
any connection to each other. So now I’m envisioning
these projects as in films or print series. It might be multi-year
and multi-country. And prior to this project,
I just didn’t see — I didn’t have
that kind of vision. I was always just, what’s
right here in front of me? And so now I’m thinking much
bigger, and that’s exciting. ♪♪ My desire is to get out
more into the world, but simultaneously, there’s this draw to start
to create roots for the family and just for beyond the arts. For just our lives in general
to feel that we have a place, and we have a community. Simultaneously to be spontaneous and follow where the world
may be taking me. DeQuincy: Right now, I’m in
a place of enjoying the mystery. Sometimes pieces will come up
here and there that I get nervous, and then I want to know
what’s gonna happen. You know, our next year, I think
is gonna be on the road, and there’s a lot of
unknowns about especially where we’re gonna be
staying during a lot of that. And what the shape
of our lives will be like. Mostly, that’s exciting. Every now and then,
I hit a point, like, well,
I’m supposed to know. I’m supposed to know, like,
well, what is it gonna be like? Where are we gonna be sleeping? And, you know, where is
the money coming from? I think a lot of that can have
to do with having a child now, but when I can relax,
and I can look at my life so far and realize
that things will work out. Then usually I can relax
and just enjoy the mystery and soak up what’s going on. I think Kavi has actually
helped me with that a lot. Amador: So, we don’t know
where home is going to be, but we’re still kind of
on the road doing the artwork and where that’s calling us. And we’re all on board
with that adventure, so it’s working out for us. ♪♪ Would I go back
and make the choice to do “Between Worlds” again? Absolutely. It felt very intimate. We’re all kind of a family. Friendships that I will hold
in my heart and appreciate when paths can cross
any time in the future. ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Announcer: Want more
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