Arts in the Parks – Texas Parks & Wildlife [Official]

Arts in the Parks – Texas Parks & Wildlife [Official]


[rolling waves] – LISA REZNICEK: It’s a way
for us to get people inspired about the outdoors
and really to take that inspiration that they have
about nature and channel it into
some art form. [music] I’m Lisa Reznicek,
Park Interpreter from Galveston Island State Park. Today in Galveston Island
State Park, we’re excited to have a sand castle contest. Everybody in the entire
family can join. You know if the contest
doesn’t draw them in, the shade actually might. It’s an experience. It’s something that I
remember when I was a kid and I went to the beach
with my family, it was something that
we all did. [music] Are you guys building
sand castles? – GIRL: Yeah. – LISA: Did you know we’re
going to have a contest? I’d love to get
you guys involved. It’s a way for us to
introduce the concept of Arts in the Parks and three-dimensional art
or sculpture. Do you sand castle at all? You got some good skills? It looks like you guys are
already working pretty hard on some sand castles. I would love for you to join. I also do camera phone hikes, watercoloring programs, drawing and journaling programs. So, just a little bit of what
the Texas State Parks can offer in our Arts in
the Parks programs. [music] Stemming back from some of the
earliest national parks that we’ve had, America has
had a really long history of fine arts and environmental
conservation. [gulls squawk] More than once I’ve heard
adults, kids and families in general come up to me
and say, “I had no idea “that I could do this outside, “and now it’s just one more
thing that gets me back outside, gets me back into
the Texas state parks.” I’ve even had a family with
young toddlers who now have watercolor sets for
the entire family, and every time they go camping, they now take out their
watercolor sets. Today we are going to do
some watercolor painting… I’m Lauren Hartwick and I am the Park Interpreter
at Lockhart State Park. …one of our dry watercolor
palettes. For me it’s just a way
to relax outside, draw in people. Now you can see right away
that the wet-on-wet technique is going to give you
nice blurry lines. I try to give them enough
information to get them started. Pretty cool, right? After that, it’s all about
giving them a chance to express whatever they
want to express. – Hmmm. – It allows people
to get outside and express their creativity and make observations
about nature and try to translate the
beauty of nature onto a page. – WOMAN: Yeah, cool. – What about green? – Yeah. – LAUREN: Are you going
to do a landscape? – GIRL: I don’t know. – LAUREN: I like having arts
in the parks programs because sometimes it draws
a different audience into the park. That is really cool. – WOMAN: That looks good. – BOY: That is still black. – LAUREN: It’s really
appealing to families… and kids, or just the young at heart. – BOY: That’s a cherry. – LAUREN: Thank you. It helps to have objects
to draw sometimes, like an antler or a feather. Something you can look at
in front of you and translate onto the page. – GIRL: I need brown. – LAUREN: Some of them were
drawing the wildlife that you would find here
in the park. – BOY: I see it! – LAUREN: We do painting,
we do block printing, we do origami. We try to do an art specific
program once a month, once every other month. That’s a beautiful painting. Lots of inspiration to be had. [laughs] Well enjoy your camping too. – GIRL: Thank you. – LAUREN: Sure thing. See you guys. Enjoy your stay. [bird chirping] – ZACH RIGGS: You’re good to go. My name is Zach Riggs… Oh yeah! I am the park interpreter here
at Dinosaur Valley State Park. Everyone comes down here and heads straight for
the dinosaur tracks. [camera shutter click] We just got finished
with archery out here. We’ve got the hiking and biking. We’ve got horse riding here. Not every park
gets to claim that. Later on tonight, we’re going to
do a nature photography class. – CASEY CLICK: I’ve taken these
pictures with my phone which is an iPhone 8. If you’ve got any questions
about these before we go, just let me know. I am going to lead a
nature photography hike which is utilizing smart
phones, primarily, because everyone has smart
phones with them all the time. Most of the time we see
something pretty and we just take a quick
picture of it. We don’t really think about
exactly where it is in the photograph, or think
about the colors. – ZACH: Casey is a
great photographer. So Casey is one of our
volunteers here at the park. She’s helped me out with so
many different programs and this nature photography hike
was actually her idea. – CASEY: We’re going to
walk about two miles. I think a lot of people
aren’t really used to exactly what all the phones can do. Is that an Android? – WOMAN: I found it. – CASEY: Okay, good. Oh yeah, that looks good. That looks great. I used to carry a camera around
all the time, years ago, wherever I went because I
never knew what was going to strike me as beautiful. But these smart phones,
they’re fantastic, and it’s nice to
have it with you. That spot right there is
one of my favorite spots, where the river curls
right there. We’re going to visit a
part of the river that’s not normally seen. People don’t go down
that way that much. That’s why I like it too. I’m not saying don’t look
at the dinosaur tracks, but don’t just look at
the dinosaur tracks. They’ve got great hiking trails,
and there’s so much more to see. [upbeat music] I just think it’s all about
where you look and how you look. If you’re looking for
little pieces of beauty, you will find them. [upbeat music] We’re surrounded by concrete
all the time, you know, and people are always
on their phones. We’re going to go this way. But if they’re using them to
capture something beautiful and get out in nature, it can maybe spur them to go out
and find different things outside that they would enjoy. [upbeat music] [crickets chirp] [whistle blows] – Sand castle contest! Some people call it like
a ditch or a moat or like a little bitty river. If you want to make a mermaid
out of sand, that’s totally fine, you can
be as creative as you want. Think big. Once people get their
hands in the sand, they don’t want to stop. That’s looking really good. I think that part of the
experience of joining the sand castle contest is just
building, being with friends, being with family, being
in a beautiful setting. I think it’s fun
just to participate. – Lots of fun, all the
kids on the beach coming together like this. It’s fun. [playful music] – LISA: Looks good. Nice. Oh, it’s like a pond,
that’s going to be great. Five minutes! The rain is coming. Even castles made of sand
fall into the sea eventually. [laughing] – MAN: It looks really nice. – LISA: You were inspired by
the beach, I love it. [clapping] We do give out prizes
to help inspire people. The most creative castle
for the day, nice job! So a lot of pencils,
stickers, temporary tattoos for all our participants. Best volcano! Ow! [applause] You guys get the best teamwork,
you work so well… We’re only going to cover just
about this much of 2,000 acres. We start with sand castles,
but we’re hoping people continue to go out and explore and continue to be
inspired by nature. [rolling waves] [rolling waves]

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